Category Archives: Lecture

For independent lectures.

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar May 3

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday May 3, 2018, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor Johanna meeting room.

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by:
Pentti Määttänen, PhD (invited guest speaker)
Marikki Hakola

See more below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


Pragmatism

by Pentti Määttänen

Abstract: Pragmatism emerged at the 1900th century as an answer to the question: What has to be changed in philosophy if Charles Darwin is right? First and foremost we are embodied creatures within nature. Culture is a product of nature in the sense that one animal species has created for itself a special kind of social and historical environment. Second, the classical view of experience as sense perception is too narrow. Experience consists of perception and action. Overt action (with or without various instruments), a stock of practical skills, sensorimotor transaction with the environment, is the basic form of experiencing, interpreting and understanding the world. The unit of analysis in the study of cognition (meanings, beliefs, emotions and values) is the organism environment interaction, not the brain or the body. The relation between knowledge and the world is not abstract correspondence between linguistic or other symbolic expressions and the world; it is mediated by various practices. Thinking is anticipation of action, to know is to know what to do, and this holds also for language.

Pentti Määttänen, PhD (Philosophy), is a Docent & Lecturer at the University of Helsinki and at Aalto University.

List of publications: http://personal.inet.fi/tiede/penttimaattanen/


SEMEION – Virtual Action Space and Cinematic Interaction

by Marikki Hakola

Abstract: SEMEION is a study about  the new concepts and possibilities of virtual action space and cinematic interaction as an essential part of it. The theoretical part of the study is carried out in the framework of Charles Sanders Peirce’s and John Dewey’s pragmatism, semiotics and aesthetics. At the heart of the study is experimental artistic activity to form a practical platform for testing theoretical ideas, concepts and findings. The practical  platform consists of four independent cinematic works.

The objective of this study is to enlarge the theory of cinema to cover new cinematic features, such as real-time, interactive, tactile, performative and spatial VR/AR forms of moving image. However, to understand interactive moving image and virtual cinematic action space and their future potential, one should first understand what the cinematic interaction itself is in an ontological sense. This guides the study into quintessential philosophical and semiotic questions. The aim is to build a theory that is relevance not only in film related issues, but also to the general questions of philosophy and aesthetics.

Pragmatist semiotics by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) crystallizes into the following philosophical approaches: Naturalism, nature constitutes understanding. Experience and acquisition of knowledge are not only observations but also activities: Being is acting. Meanings take shape through action. According to John Dewey’s (1859-1952) pragmatist aesthetics, experience (art) is a collective and cultural activity. Physical and symbolic practices are inseparable and a part of nature.

Referring to Peirce and Dewey , the theoretical approach of the study is based on the following philosophical conceptions:

–       The basis of the cinematic experience is in symbolic thinking

–       Cinematic signs have the ability to refer beyond themselves

–       Understanding the interaction between cinematic signs and the spectator is the same than understanding the interaction between human and the world (nature)

–       Pragmatism in a case of cinema means use and situational meaning of all kinds of cinematic signs

–       The cinematic object and the subject are always inseparable

–       Art of cinema is a special symbolic practice and will only become a work of art through experience.

The focus is to develop the tools for understanding the structure and montage of the interactive moving image from author’s, especially concept designer’s, screenwriter’s and director’s points of view. The special attention is paid to the challenges of concept design, to the designer’s situation between the new idea and the finished artistic plan, script or screenplay.

The study is implemented through artistic approach and cinematic works produced by the professional film and performing artists’ teams. Practical testing gives useful, illustrative, instructive and sensory feedback from the tested ideas, subjects and concepts. The study also benefits greatly from the direct feedback and observations of the team members, the professional artists and film makers.

The goal is to help deepen screenwriter’s, designer’s and director’s understanding and views on the potential of a cinematic virtual space and interactive moving image and thus provide opportunities for new thinking and concept development. The aim is that the study would encourage future authors in their artistic work to create courageous and interesting concepts for future interactive cinema.

Marikki Hakola is a Doctoral Student at the Department of Media. She graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts Helsinki as a visual artist in 1984. Her works include dance and music films, documentaries, video artworks, performances, stage designs, web projects and artistic research projects. Hakola’s works have been broadcast and screened international on television channels, in art museums and festivals. Her works have been exhibited at several art museums, collections and archives, such as the Musée National d’Art Moderne in Centre Pompidou, Paris, the Helsinki Art Museum and Museum of Contemporary Arts Kiasma Helsinki.

Hakola’s works include music films Luonnotar (2010), Otto (2009), Butterfly Lovers (2005), L’Enfant et les sortiléges (2004), the live performances Scaramouche (2015) and Piipää (1987-2011), telepresence project Triad (1998-99), video works Stilleben – Milena’s Journey (1989), TransVersum (1993) and Continuum (1999), installations The Time is Right for… (1984), PRE (1984), Pinus (1990), Ferris Wheel (1991), Milena Distanz (1992), Figure (2000), Moloch (2010) and Frontiers (2014).

Marikki Hakola CV: https://www.kroma.fi/marikkicv/

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar April 19

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday April 19, 2018, from 17:00–20:00 (NOTE: Starting time one hour later)
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor Johanna meeting room.

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by:
Sally Davison (guest lecture)
Andy Best: Social Empowerment through Dance and Media Performance
See more below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


Invited guest speaker:

Sally Davison is a dance artist and choreographer whose work deeply attends to the existential qualities of the moving body and life more broadly, focusing in particular on aspects of inclusion, accessibility and equality. Davison is Chairperson of DanceAbility Finland ry an organisation dedicated to promoting inclusion through dance, and Artistic Director of Kaaos Company an inclusive professional dance company based in Helsinki since 2010.

 

Social Empowerment through Dance and Media Performance

by Andy Best

Abstract: This presentation illustrates research carried out with individuals from Dancehearts, a performance group for young people with disabilities. I seek to show that interactive media technologies can significantly increase the level of social empowerment experienced by individuals taking part in group public performance by magnifying the effect of their own actions and movement in the space. Using custom designed wireless electronic controllers, the dancers “play” music and sound using the movements of their bodies and wheelchairs. They are no longer purely a choreographed performer, but in addition they cause affect to the whole performance space through aural interaction, controlling the soundscape used in the performance. For the differently-abled person, the ability to harness media technologies for artistic expression challenges their perceived public role as passive object. They become, through their own actions, active subjects causing affect to the whole audience experience.

Andy Best is a media artist, sculptor and educator, specialising in playful and provocative interactions and installations. Andy’s work tackles social and political themes, and he seeks collaboration in diverse spheres such as data visualisation, live performance, and physical interaction design. Between 2002 and 2013 Andy was principal lecturer of Digital Arts at Turku University of Applied Sciences. Since 2014 he has been lecturer in sculpture at Aalto University. Andy is currently Head of the Center for General Studies. He is a doctoral student at Aalto Media Lab, researching possibilities for social empowerment through collaborative interaction in media environments, with emphasis on working with people with disabilities.

 

 

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar March 22

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday March 22, 2018, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by:
Heli Rantavuo, Spotify (guest lecture): Designing for People in the Age of Machine Learning
Iida Hietala: Self-Creation Through Arts Consumption and Digital Content Production
See abstracts below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


Designing for People in the Age of Machine Learning

by Heli Rantavuo

Abstract: Heli’s talk discusses challenges to the user-centred design process in internet companies where, increasingly, the products designed are algorithm-based ‘algo-products’. At the level of their practice, designers and researchers need to develop new skills, work effectively with new disciplines such as data analytics, and formulate new questions and problematics. At a more fundamental level, for user-centred design to remain human-centred design, questions of ethics and morality gain importance, and conventional methods of knowing about human and user experience need to be re-examined. The talk discusses these topics in light of recent studies in algorithmic bias and data anthropology and through industry practice in companies such as Spotify, Google and eBay.

IMG_4734Heli Rantavuo, is Director of insights for global growth at Spotify R&D. She graduated as Doctor of Arts from the Media Lab in 2009 and has since then worked as design researcher and research leader at Spotify, eBay, Microsoft and Nokia in London, Stockholm and Helsinki. Heli’s particular focus in the tech industry is creating practices that are multi-method and multi-disciplinary: understanding people across product, engineering and design in a way that combines ethnography, user experience and data analysis. At the moment Heli investigates what it means to design with algorithms for global audiences.


Self-Creation Through Arts Consumption and Digital Content Production

by Iida Hietala

Abstract: Visitors to contemporary art exhibitions and museums take pictures of the artworks with their smartphones. They edit the best one and upload it on a social media platform (e.g. Instagram) with hashtags such as #art, #contemporaryart or #museumselfie. Sometimes this has caused some undesirable consequences; selfie-takers have even smashed artworks when trying to take the perfect shot. Albeit not everyone takes pictures in an exhibition, Instagram is a pivotal part of the everyday visual environment of its 600 million active users.

Drawing on new media studies and consumer research, the project investigates how one’s arts consumption experiences and digital practices are connected in an art exhibition context. It also explores how this might contribute to an individual’s creation of self and subjectivity. By means of ethnography, the research aims at answering the following questions: What kind of an art experience is taking place? What kind of creativity is enabled? By producing content, are these people producing themselves as artists? Will people choose an art exhibition based on its ’instagrammability’?

iidakuvaIida Hietala is a doctoral candidate at Aalto University Media Lab. She is a Master of Science (Econ.) in Marketing, and a Master of Social Sciences in Journalism and Mass Communication. Her research focuses on the intersections of arts, consumerism, digital culture, and subjectivity.

Open guest lecture by Yannick Rochat

Welcome to an open guest lecture:

Yannick Rochat, University of Lausanne (UNIL)

The Time Machine: Dynamics of Information in the Digital Humanities

Friday February 2, 2018, from 10:00–12:00
Otakaari 1 X, lecture hall A1
Otaniemi, Espoo

This guest lecture is part of a course Topics in Visualization and Cultural Analytics DOM-E5103 at the Department of Media, Media Lab, but open for everyone interested!

Warmly welcome!

Abstract: Through the concept of «time machine» as it is understood in the digital humanities, Yannick Rochat will present some of the current problematics of creating interactive information systems in that field: reading and interpreting archives, architectural modeling, game design, new media studies.

09_Yannick_Rochat_72dpi_DSC_7967©SLiphardtYannick Rochat is a junior lecturer at the faculty of arts of the University of Lausanne (UNIL). He owns a MSc in mathematics and a PhD in mathematics applied to humanities and social sciences. His fields of study are digital humanities, new media and game studies. He is an occasional contributor to Swiss newspaper Le Temps.

 

yannick_rochat_1


Topics in Visualization and Cultural Analytics DOM-E5103 – Responsible teachers: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen, Mamdooh Afadile, Khalil Klouche

Media Lab DA Seminar: Guest lecture by Prof. Dagny Stuedahl

Welcome to an open guest lecture:

Prof. Dagny Stuedahl, OsloMet – city university (Norway), Department of Journalism and Media studies:

Making dialogues work

Time: Thursday January 18, 2018, 4pm–6pm
Location: Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Johanna meeting room, 1st floor

This guest lecture is part of Media Lab DA Seminar at the Department of Media but open for everyone interested!

Warmly welcome!

More information:

This presentation will describe a participatory exhibition design prosess including public hearings, interviews, and round table sessions related to the exhibition FOLK which opens at Norwegian Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine (NTM) in March 2018. Also a participatory project used methods from participatory design ( PD)  for a year long process involving a group of 9 multiethnic young people to discuss identity, ethnicity and belonging. The goal of the participatory process was originally to design engaging activities for young people related to the theme of the exhibition, race and ethnicity, but ended with making a participatory sound installation that will become part of the exhibition.

The particiaptory process became part of research and communication activities of the curatorial study, which compared contemporary views on ethnicity with perspectives in historical racial science and contemporary research on human biological variation and their multiple entanglements with society, culture, economy, politics, and technology. Hence, the curatorial research interweave understandings of individual and group identities with broader political and ethical issues such as concerns on migration, the rise of racist and discriminatory attitudes, or indigenous peoples rights.

The way the curatorial research focus shaped the participatory process, and the way the young people where at each workshop responded to the current state of the curatorial work with the exhibition will be the main focus of the presentation. The museum did paralell to the participatory design process arrange multiple encounters through diverse communication formats including, focus-group workshops, public lectures, and hearings, and the presentation will reflect on the outcome from each of these compared to the longterm collaboration in the youth participation project.

NTM has earlier developed a record of research-based exhibitions and activities and has methodically been investigating the integration of research with communication and management of cultural heritage. Meanwhile, the participatory design proces was new to them, and the presentation will describe how the museum professionals approached the method, and how they integrated a participatory thinking in their curatorial reflections.

See: stuedahl.no

Welcome!


DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

PhD François Pachet, Spotify – A Guest lecture

Welcome to an open lecture at Media Lab!

PhD François Pachet, Director of Spotify Creator Technology Research Lab

‘Artificial Intelligence for music generation: the making of the album “Hello World”‘

Time: Thursday January 11, 2018, 4pm–6pm
Location: Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Johanna meeting room, 1st floor

This guest lecture is part of Media Lab DA Seminar but open for everyone interested!

Warmly welcome!

François Pachet is director of the Spotify CTRL (Creator Research Technology Lab).

He is the former director of the SONY Computer Science Laboratory Paris, where he led the music research team. He received his Ph.D. and Habilitation degrees from Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC). He is a Civil Engineer (Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées) and was Assistant Professor in Artificial Intelligence at UPMC until 1997. He joined the Sony Computer Science Laboratory in 1997 and created the music team to conduct research on interactive music listening, composition and performance. Since its creation, the team developed several award winning technologies (constraint-based spatialisation, intelligent music scheduling using metadata) and systems: MusicSpace, PathBuilder, Continuator for interactive music improvisation, Flow Composer, etc.).

He has been Principal Investigator of the Flow Machines ERC Advanced Grant, and has launched the first multi-artist mainstream music album composed with AI. His current goal in Spotify is to build a new generation of tools to assist music creation.

François Pachet has published intensively in artificial intelligence and computer music. He was elected ECCAI Fellow in 2014 and he is Doctor Honoris Causa of the University of Pernambuco (Brazil).

He is also an accomplished musician (guitar, composition) and has published two music albums (in jazz and pop) as composer and performer.

See: www.francoispachet.fr

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar November 23

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday November 23, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Professor Jari Saramäki, Dept. of Computer Science, and Khalil Klouche, doctoral student at Media Lab. See abstracts below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


Mobile phones, social networks, and patterns of interaction

by Professor Jari Saramäki

Abstract: The world is run by networks – from networks of biological processes inside our cells to the neural networks of our brains, and very importantly, to the social networks that we are all part of. Many of the most important, disruptive technological changes of the recent decades have been driven by our need to form and maintain social ties: mobile telephones, the Internet, social media platforms. However, science has only lately started to uncover the large-scale features of human social networks. I will present a series of discoveries on human social networks, obtained with the help of Big Data on mobile phone communication between millions of individuals. I will focus on the importance of weak ties, the persistence of the ways how we structure our social networks, and the tendency for similar people to communicate with each other, and discuss the implications of these findings.

file_crop1_1157679_y_384Prof. Jari Saramäki (born 1971) is an internationally recognised scholar working in the fields of complex systems and networks (ISI Web of Science: 80 publications, 3505 citations, h-index 27 / Google Scholar: h-index 35, 7460 citations). He received his PhD in 1998 in engineering physics, studying low-temperature quantum phenomena. He has also worked in data mining and telecommunications industries. He has been appointed an invited professor at École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France (May 2017), visiting scholar at the University of Oxford, UK (fall 2010) and visiting professor at the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium (Sept 2008). He has been one of the pioneers of the temporal networks framework and is well-known for work in social networks and computational social science.


iMac

Entity-based Affordances for Fluid Information Practices

by Khalil Klouche

Abstract: In the early 90s, document linking and embedding was described as the new hypermedia structuring paradigm, and the world wide web was quickly spreading, fueled by the miracle of the hyperlink. Since then, users are guided from one source of information to another via fixed references determined by the content creators, and rely on search engines when they need personalized access points to the information space. Although the same paradigm has subsisted so far, it is not suited to the current reality of information access, which brings both challenges and technical opportunities, and makes for an appropriate time to think of an alternative information seeking paradigm.

The amount of available information keeps on growing, and access points provided by conventional query-and-response search engines – the ten blue links – are too narrow to offer a sensible overview of available material related to a given query. We need options for broader and more personalized access to information, as well as support for making sense of it. Thankfully, new technologies in information retrieval create opportunities to address these problems and rethink on-line media access and structuring. As entity search and recommendation become a reality, the user’s information trail relies less on documents linked explicitly by content creators. Users have now the opportunity to finely steer their progression within the information space, in accordance to their immediate needs, understanding and inspiration. Related information and overview of the data can be computed on the fly to suit the very specific needs of each user at any time during the exploration, providing constant access to more detailed or more general information, new directions and branching topics.

My research explores interaction techniques designed to support entity-based information exploration, and grounds it in available literature. The main contribution is a design template describing the hypercue, an interactive representation of entities that provides personalized access points to information, and which serves as a complement to the hyperlink. Hypercues create opportunities to flexibly discover, store and share information, and gain insights of the data. The Hypercue design template consists of a minimal set of affordances that ensure all important features for supporting exploratory search can be addressed, while leaving enough design space to facilitate integration within a variety of systems.

HIIT_OtaniemiKhalil Klouche is a doctoral student at Media Lab Helsinki and a researcher in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) at the Computer Science department of University of Helsinki. He holds a master’s degree in interactive design from the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland. His research focuses on the design, development and evaluation of novel interactive systems to access and explore information.

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar October 26

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday October 26, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Jane Vita and Jihye Lee. See abstracts below.


servicesandox_assets

Co-creating digital experiences for places

A multilayered and multidisciplinary view on designing for hybrid services, digital and physical, to empower experiences and build conversations in between people and places.

by Jane Vita

Abstract: Technology in the physical environment can be the elephant in the room when poorly implemented. To better understand how well technology fits into different physical environments, it is necessary not only to discover the right moment to bring digital to space and understand the customer’s needs but also have the multidisciplinary experts involved in its concept creation; working together to achieve the desired goals.

This research aims to help professionals understand the role of technology in places and to give them tools that could meaningfully maximise technology’s role. This study will focus on building a user-centered framework that utilizes concept layers as the groundwork.

The framework will have a significant focus on experience and technology. The layers will be a reproduction of what factors are essential to consider when designing hybrid services, combining physical and digital. The research will result in the production of a user-centered framework, a toolkit and utilization guide for designing better places for a hybrid environment.

To start experimenting, Jane has created the Service Sandbox method and toolkit, and together with few colleagues, she has applied the tool to the context of Smart Living. She has facilitated few workshops with professionals and in conferences around the world. More about Service Sandbox: http://www.servicesandbox.net

jane_picJane Vita – Brazilian living in Finland – Service Design Lead at Digitalist and Ph.D. student at Aalto, New media, LeGroup.

Over the past 19 years, I’ve had the opportunity to gain experience in many of the design competencies, with projects in a range of different industries. At Digitalist I’m facilitating internal and external dialogue around the service design practice area. In client projects, my role is to act as a lead consultant helping customers to discover their digital future. These projects vary from extensive discovery to design sprints.

I conduct a Service Design in Digital Context course lectures in the Service Innovation and Design program at Laurea University. I’m also a Ph.D. student at Aalto University, together with Learning Environments Research Group I get involved in research, design, and development of New Media tools, as well as their use and application, in the field of learning.

Co-creation is an integral part of my work as service design. There are countless tools out there available to map experiences, describe paths and journeys, but what I needed was a tool to explore, play freely and in an open environment and the context of a place. I have experienced many design tools, and I even gave workshops at ISA14, Interaction 16 and Interaction 17 around the topic of Intelligent Spaces. However, together with few colleagues and as part of my research and with the client permission, I’m creating a Service Sandbox to prototype “smart experiences,” along with different canvases to map and validate the value the services would bring for the customers.

More about Jane: http://www.janevita.com


Screen Shot 2017-10-11 at 12.01.27 copy

(Image Courtesy : The CHESS Project)

Investigating User Experience(UX) Factors in Digital Heritage

by Jihye Lee

Abstract: Digital Heritage presented by augmented/virtual reality technology offers audiences entry to spaces that are difficult to access physically or in time such as the past. Since digital technology has emerged significantly, digital heritage realm seems blossom accordingly. However, a question that emerges is: when digital heritage experience is planned, what elements of user experience(UX) should be considered? The UX might be differently designed in accordance with the heritage’s characteristics or its goal.

Investigating recent digital heritage works, the researcher will analyze them in a point of factors of user experience and argue that each different UX brings different effects for audiences. Conversely, different goal in designing digital heritage should have different UX approach. In this sense, the researcher attempts to categorize the works of digital heritage by its UX approach, and explore its characteristics in details. Throughout the analysis, further study and implementation can be expected for designers who build digital heritage experience to consider more precise and effective UX factors at the early stage of the design process.

Screen Shot 2017-10-11 at 12.01.45Jihye Lee is a visiting researcher at the Department of Media at Aalto University, and a recent PhD graduate in Film and Digital Media Design at the Hong Ik University, Seoul, South Korea. Her PhD thesis was about participatory process in mobile Augmented Reality with anthropological approach. She has worked in cultural institutions and colleges with interest in interactive storytelling and participatory design. Due to recent participation in digital heritage museum project in Korea, she has begun to focus on designing in digital heritage sector.

HELDIG DI­GITAL HU­MAN­IT­IES SUM­MIT 2017

Oct 18, 2017, 9:00–18:00  (Wednesday)

University of Helsinki, Main Building, Small Hall (Pieni juhlasali), 4050
Fabianinkatu 33, Helsinki, FINLAND

Helsinki Centre for Digital Humanities (HELDIG) was launched by a kick-off symposium on Oct 6, 2016 that was attended by some 200 friends of Digital Humanities. HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 provides a snapshot of activities within the centre and its collaboration network after the first year of operation, facilitating networking and sharing results within the Finnish community of Digital Humanities research and education and beyond.

PRO­GRAMME
After opening the Summit, the first presentation slot of the day contains talks from the seven faculties of the University of Helsinki involved in the HELDIG initiative. After this, presentations from collaborating organizations of the HELDIG network are heard. After the lunch, talks about projects, research, and applications underway are given.

After the presentations, there is a networking event based on posters and demos in the lobby, with nibbles and cocktails served.

SEE MORE: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/helsinki-centre-for-digital-humanities/heldig-digital-humanities-summit-2017

RE­GIS­TRA­TION
Participation in HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 is open and free, but registration is required for catering.

Register here Tuesday 10th October latest :

https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/81397/lomake.html