Category Archives: Design

Design or Die – Creative Value Creation and Competitiveness

Quite often people in the creative sector are not very familiar with selling their doings nor they are aware of their IPR. The seminar will also discus how companies and public sector could make use of design in multi disciplinary product and service development, innovation processes and strategic planning. 

You are welcome to discuss with us on Tuesday 4 December 2018 at 10-13 at Harald Herlin Learning Centre. 

https://studios.aalto.fi/design-or-die-event

Register for participation RSVP 3rd Dec at 9 the latest

Program:

Welcome to Aalto
JUHANI TENHUNEN (Aalto)
Design or Die – project in short
ANU RAAPPANA (LAMK)
Creative Industry as Primary Industry – not Just a Supporter
PETRA TARJANNE (TEM)
Crossing Borders between Design Education and Work Life through Collaborative Experimentation
TARJA SALMELA-LEPPÄNEN (ULapland)
 
Three Perspectives for Creative Work and Selling
”Selling Design”,
”Designers as Sellers”,
”Designing B2B Selling”
MIKKO ILLI (Aalto), MARIA KUUSISTO (Sherpa)
IPR Toolkit for Designers
JUSSI ILVONEN (Ornamo)
Panel discussion and questions 10-20 minutes.

Post-doc in creative circular economies

Full time, 18 months Post-Doc Position based at QUB, Belfast

Short description of the project:

Advancing Creative Circular Economies for Plastics via Technological-Social Transitions (ACCEPT Transitions) 

Queens University Belfast

This is a unique multidisciplinary multi-scaled project that brings together polymer scientists, chemists, engineers, architects/designers, political scientists, psychologists, users and manufacturers – The architect/designer Post-doc will bring a design and curatorial approach to the process. 

The overall project aims to integrate innovation and creative thinking across technological, policy, consumer behaviour and supply chain management domains on a focused region of the UK ie NI. It aims to develop ‘socio- technological transitions’ that facilitate a just transition to a circular economy for existing and future plastics, by conserving and creating sustainable energy and materials, developing new products and green jobs, and supporting economic growth in NI and the wider UK. 

The Post-Doc role will involve working with the QUB polymer centre to design, develop and prototype a 3-D interlocking block using plastic waste to suit the principles of circular design. The role will involve collaborating with psychologists to test and collate manufacturer and consumer/user response to the resultant prototypes, and also being responsible for curating outcomes across the entire project into a public exhibition. 

The role requires self- and project management skills, a creative approach, good documentation practices, digital imaging skills and a willingness to learn new software where necessary. 

This is a unique chance to work with a diverse and supportive academic team alongside six other post-docs.  Ruth Morrow (professor of Archtiecture) will be supporting the role as one of the project Co-I’s

Contact ruth.morrow@qub.ac.uk

Defence in the field of New Media: MA Eva Durall

MA Eva Durall will defend her doctoral dissertation

Reflection and Self-Regulation Using Monitoring Tools in Learning: Critical Design Exploration on Self-Monitoring During Independent Study

Friday 2 November 2018
Otakaari 1x, room A1
Starting at 12.00

Opponent: PhD prof. Anders Morch, University of Oslo
Custos: prof. Teemu Leinonen

Discussion will be in English.

 


 

More information:

In this dissertation opportunities and challenges of using monitoring tools in learning are critically explored from a design perspective. The results are two-fold: a design prototype that uses self-monitoring in independent learning situations (Feeler), and identification of reflection and self-regulation as relevant skills for autonomous and independent learning that self-monitoring tools can support. In light of these findings, this research proposes a set of design principles to guide further designs of monitoring tools aiming to support learning.

Inspired by critical and speculative design approaches, the Feeler prototype presents an extreme, yet plausible case of monitoring physiological data, which consists in monitoring brain activity to detect learners’ attention and relaxation levels during independent study. The design of the prototype was influenced by human-centered tradition and the participatory design approach. The prototype allowed students to experience and researchers to study a hypothetical solution regarding the use of self-monitoring tools during independent study.

The tests conducted as part of this research brought light into the dominant values and socio-economic discourses associated to mainstream uses of monitoring tools, and supported students critically reflect about these tools. In this regard, this research highlights the value of critical and speculative design approaches to research and discuss emerging technologies in learning and teaching.

This research identifies several design principles, which are grouped around the key themes of self-knowledge, agency-oriented technology, reflection and self-regulation. These principles are exemplified with the Feeler prototype in order to help practitioners and researchers understand how the empirical findings can be translated into actionable ideas when designing monitoring tools. This research points at data-privacy and design for autonomy as important design implications for the design of monitoring tools in learning. There is also a need for further research on these.

Monitoring technologies enable the automatic collection and analysis of data to provide feedback about diverse activities and processes. Despite these technologies are increasingly present in different contexts of human life, for instance in the quantified self movement, in learning, monitoring tools are still an emerging technology. To date, most approaches to use monitoring tools in learning have focused on finding application areas without problematising the context of use. Little attention has been paid to issues like the nature of data and the inferences that are made based on them, the role of students in learning, and the conception of learning and technology. This dissertation addresses this research gap and provides an understanding of the issues related to the design of monitoring tools and the adoption of techno-monitoring practices in learning.

Welcome!

Media Lab Doctoral seminar together with the Department of Design!

Welcome to the first joint research seminar hosted by Department of Media and Department of Design. During the seminar you will be treated with inspiring and cutting edge research as well as some sparkling!

When? Wednesday 13 December, from 15:00-17:00.
Where? Johanna meeting room (116), Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor.

Presentations in the event follow the PechaKucha format: each presentation contains 20 slides that are shown 20 seconds each. Simple and inspiring!

DOM Presentations by:
Khalil Klouche: Designing for Information Exploration
Yrjö Tuunanen: Narrative Transparency in Online Journalism

DOD Presentations by:
Elif Öztekin: Eco-settlements as Niche Innovations for Sustainability Transitions

Responsible teachers: 
Lily Díaz-Kommonen, Professor of New Media, Department of Media
Miikka J. Lehtonen, Visiting Assistant Professor in Design Business Management

This seminar is open for everyone interested in contemporary research in media and design.

Welcome!

2nd Call for Papers: DRS Special Interest Groups on Experiential Knowledge (EKSIG)

Design Research Society 2018 
University of Limerick
25th-28th June 2018
 
 
Track Theme:
EXPERIENTIAL KNOWLEDGE IN COLLABORATIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY DESIGN RESEARCH
 
Arguably, design practice has transformed from one based on the production of artefacts to one that engages expertise and knowledge from multiple disciplines. Collaboration between stakeholders has become indispensible, and research has played a crucial role in exploring the changing territorial context of designing and making. This is particularly evident in the fields of New Materials, Smart Textiles and Human-Computer-Interaction (HCI), where research tends to be conducted in teams comprising different disciplinary experts who may work across academic, commercial and public sectors, and may include designers alongside, for example, scientists, technologists, artists, business strategists and policy makers. Various partners are in dialogue with one another, developing, consolidating and enhancing knowledge while generating new opportunities for interdisciplinary knowledge exchange.

The EKSIG track aims to examine collaboration within design research teams that comprise members with diverse disciplinary expertise. This is to understand how individual experiential knowledge, or knowledge gained by practice, is shared, how collective experiential knowledge is accumulated and communicated in and through collaboration, and how it is embodied in the outputs and may be traced back to the origin of the practice. The track also aims to illuminate making as the action of change in which matter and materials are transformed through collaboration, interaction or negotiation between the collaborative team and their material environment. Making within collaborations occurs in multiple forms, on many levels and in different contexts and, through making, meaning is made, communicated and shared. Learning is a process of change where existing knowledge and experience of a certain topic is reviewed, added or transformed. The track will explore how learning is transferred and articulated within multidisciplinary teams. Starting with an understanding of making and collaborative learning, it will discuss how we can create a greater awareness of our responsibilities as designers, researchers, consumers, teachers and members of society.

We welcome papers which exemplify interdisciplinarity through worked examples, and from researchers and practitioners whose work is centred on the experiential knowledge of collaborative work in interdisciplinary projects. We are interested in building a rich collection of case studies that may contribute to a more systematic approach for studying and integrating experiential knowledge into design practice and research. Submissions should focus on peer-level collaboration, illuminating its usefulness for the partners involved, and highlight the relationships built within the collaboration, as well as the approaches used and the new knowledge gained and transferred within the team.


Keywords: collaboration, design practice and research, experiential knowledge, interdisciplinary, making, materiality


Indicative references:

Abrahamson, D. & Chase, K. (2015). Interfacing Practices: Domain Theory Emerges via Collaborative Reflection. Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 16(3): 372–389. DOI: 10.1080/14623943.2015.1052384.

Bhömer, M., Tomico, O., Kleinsmann, M., Kuusk, K. & Wensveen, S. (2012). Designing Smart Textile Services Through Value Networks, Team Mental Models and Shared Ownership. In Proceedings of the Third Service Design and Service Innovation Conference (pp. 53–63). Espoo: Laurea University of Applied Sciences.

Bowen, S., Durrant, A., Nissen, B., Bowers, J. & Wright, P. (2016). The Value of Designers’ Creative Practice within Complex Collaborations. Design Studies, 46, 174-198. DOI: 10.1016/j.destud.2016.06.001.

Ingold, T. (2013). Making: Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture. London: Routledge.

Mikkonen, J. & Pouta, E. (2016). Flexible Wire-Component for Weaving Electronic Textiles. In Proceedings of 2016 IEEE 66th Electronic Components and Technology Conference (pp. 1656–1663). DOI 10.1109/ECTC.2016.180.

Nimkulrat, N. & Matthews, J. (forthcoming 2017). Ways of Being Strands: Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration Using Craft and Mathematics. Design Issues, 33(4).

Rutkowska, J., Lamas, D., Visser, F. S., Wodyk, Z., & Bańka, O. (2017). Shaping Loyalty: Experiences from Design Research Practice. Interactions24(3), 60–65.

Submission:

– Your paper will need to be between 5000 and 6000 words (maximum) in length excluding abstract and references using formatting applied in the template (see attached).
– All submissions must be in the English language.
– The online submission system will be open from 5th September 2017 and full papers must be submitted by midnight on 6th November 2017.

Key Dates:

– Submission system opens:  5th September 2017
– Deadline for full papers: 6th November 2017
– Notification of accepted papers:  8th February 2018
– Deadline for full paper revisions:  6th March 2018
– Final acceptance of revised papers:  27th March 2018
– Conference Dates: 25th-28th June 2018

Track Chair: Nithikul Nimkulrat, Estonian Academy of Arts, Estonia

Track Sub-Chairs:

Abigail Durrant, Northumbria University, UK
Camilla Groth, University College of Southeast Norway, Norway
Marte S. Gulliksen, University College of Southeast Norway, Norway
Kristi Kuusk, Estonian Academy of Arts, Estonia
David Lamas, Tallinn University, Estonia
Janette Matthews, Loughborough University, UK
Jussi Mikkonen, Aalto University, Finland
Oscar Tomico, Elisava, Barcelona School of Design and Engineering, Spain and Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Stephan Wensveen, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands


 
 
Contact
 
Any enquiries about the conference, please contact drs2018limerick@ul.ie
Any enquiries about the EKSIG track, please contact nithikul.nimkulrat@artun.ee

Designing Knowledge

Aalto University, Department of Media and ACM SIGGRAPH would like to invite you and your community to take part in Designing Knowledge online exhibition.

We encourage unique submissions that present different ways of ‘thinking and doing things in knowledge production and design’.

We welcome works describing how digital archives are used in activities that involve the creation, dissemination, transformation, and sharing of knowledge on a wide variety of topics such as:

• Digital Arts and Computer Graphics
• Digital Humanities
• Sciences

Submissions must include at least 10 keywords that accurately describe the work and areas of knowledge and activity.

Final deadline on the 30th of September

For more information please visit: https://designing-knowledge.siggraph.org/wp

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Journal for Artistic Research (JAR)

The deadline for consideration is 15 September 2017

JAR publishes artistic research from all arts disciplines, with or without academic affiliation, and includes the work of artistic research practitioners and theorists. Rethinking the traditional journal format, JAR offers its contributors a free-to-use online space called the Research Catalogue (RC) where text can be woven together with image, audio and video material. The Journal is specifically interested in contributions that reflect upon and expose artistic practice as research, and welcomes submissions from artists interested in exchanging ideas and opening up the processes and methodologies that underlie their practice. Please view our archive to get a sense of what we publish.

To be considered for Peer Review, the editorial board considers:

1. Whether the exposition exposes artistic practice as research. This engages with questions and claims about knowledge within practice. For a detailed articulation of this please read the editorial to JAR0

http://www.jar-online.net/issue-0

2. The degree to which the exposition is conceptually and artistically strong, considered, and significant to the field.

3. Whether the multimedia and design capacities of the RC have been used effectively and meaningfully to support the argument or understanding of the research.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account on the RC and use the online space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit:

www.jar-online.net/submissions/

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, at submissions@jar-online.net

JAR works with an international editorial board and a large panel of peer-reviewers.

Editor in Chief: Michael Schwab

Peer Review Editor: Julian Klein

Editorial Board: Alex Arteaga, Annette Arlander, Sher Doruff, Barnaby Drabble, Mika Elo, Leonella Grasso Caprioli, Yara Guasque, Julian Klein and Mareli Stolp.

JAR is published by the Society for Artistic Research (SAR)

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/society-for-artistic-research

an independent, non-profit association. You can support JAR by becoming an individual or institutional member of SAR. More information can be found here

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/membership/membership-schemes
Contact: jar@jar-online.net

6th International Conference on Communication, Media, Technology and Design

www.cmdconf.net

October 06 – 08, 2017 – Famagusta – North Cyprus

Abstract Submissions Deadline: August 31, 2017

This conference aims for the exchange of information on research, development, and applications are categorized under main headings as Communication Technologies, Social Media, Visual Communication and Design, Integrated Marketing Communication, Communication Education, Film Studies, Communication Barriers, Health Communication, Media Management and Economics, Political Communication, Discourse Analysis, Communication in Education, and Communication and Media Studies in General.

We invite you to attend The International Conference on Communication, Media Studies and Design and submit proposals for papers.

Accepted papers will be included in the Conference Proceedings (Soft Copy) and published in the conference website. Besides, all papers will be published in one of the following supporting journals.

– Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies (OJCMT)

– Contemporary Educational Technology (CEDTECH)

– Online Journal of Art and Design (OJAD)

– The Online Journal of Communication and Media (TOJCAM)

CFP: iXDA and Civic Design

2 CfP’s:

1) iXDA call open due 13 Sep 17 at 11.59 CET; LYON FRANCE 3-8 Feb 2018
Interaction18.ixda.org
Lyon France
Call for Proposals due 13 Sep 2017 at 11.59 CET
———————————-
2) Call for Participation: Civic Design | On the Theory and Practice of the Social and Political in Design

14. Annual Conference | German Society for Design Theory and Research (DGTF) | Burg Giebichstein University of Art and Design, Halle | 01.-02.12.2017

We are currently experiencing a new discursive and practical shift toward the political and social dimensions in design. In close interaction to social transformations of the last few decades, the discipline of design is currently seeking to redefine itself in its relationship to socio-political complexity. The plethora of terms such as social design, transition design, transformative design and design for social innovation could be seen as a new “social turn” for design, which now increasingly understands its tasks to include programmatic transformation of societal realities. Design competency is gaining ground in transdisciplinary contexts and is consulted ever more on a practical as well as a discursive level, at the interface between business, civil society and politics, in the proverbial elevator of the bottom-up and the top-down. New questions arise regarding how roles are to be understood, depth of impact and fields of activity for design in sociopolitical transformation processes. And the disciplinary borderlines are being redrawn for design’s political realm of action.

Design has indeed always had its hand in or at least touched upon big social change processes – whether through taking a modernist stance, like the hfg Ulm or the Bauhaus, or its antithesis in disegno radicale or later critical design, but also through applying designerly strategies in the construction of populist folk identities, as with National Socialism. Today, however, a reevaluation seems to be shifting the very object of design: away from the creation of thingly artifacts toward the design of processes in the context of social complexity. Such design must be understood both conceptually and discursively in regards to its dedicated immediacy to change processes, as it is attributed with the capability to contribute to change in conjunction with other actors.

TThis development is not reducible to a broadening of design’s action horizon, rather it extends beyond the discipline itself. For example, policy makers are increasingly taking up design as a promising field for partnerships and methodologies. Complementary, new forms of communities, collectives, civic initiatives and DIY cultures are gaining political significance and are developing new forms of access and participation, drawing attention to design as a planning discipline at the intersection of digital technology, the open source community and cultural & urban studies. Digitization processes initiate and reinforce these developments, e.g. through the diversification of institutions of information, through new avenues of production or through the rising importance of digital platforms for self-organization and opinion forming.

This is the backdrop for the 14th annual DGTF Conference. We wish to more clearly define the fields of action between political decision-making power, civil society and the spheres of everyday life.

Our object of discussion will be the internal and interdisciplinary negotiations of the social and the political in design. We will be addressing both the practical as well as the theoretical and normative approaches to situate and differentiate design’s new relations to politics and society. We will also try to trace the historical developments that have led to this new negotiation in order to form the basis for discussion that synthesizes past theses and goes further.
In probing these dimensions, we will ask the following questions:

– What historical approaches are being referred to, which are we ignoring?
– What models and self-understandings do we assume, how can we contextualize these roles?
– What impact can we have on this context, what contributions can we make, where are the pitfalls?
– How far dare we go in understanding these new developments as “design” and at what point are we talking about something else entirely?

We pursue these issues in moderated panels, short lectures and parallel workshops/roundtables, as well as with an accompanying exhibition. Our three curated panels will

1. look at the origins – by asking what approaches do we refer to when discussing social and political design,

2. situate where the status quo lies in the tension between current design approaches in the area of political     initiatives and at the level of established institutions, and

3. inquire into the role of digitization processes for the evolution of a “civic design.”

In addition to the panels, we extend the invitation to contributions that conform to the following formats:
Short lectures (10 minutes): Lectures may present current practical project examples as well as discursive approaches connected to the conference theme on design practice and research and which fall  within the scope of social or political design.

Roundtables and workshops (90 minutes each): We welcome suggestions for parallel roundtables and workshops for the second half of the last conference day. We are equally open to recommendations for moderation and forms that foster further discussion and brings together themes presented. Roundtables should be an open forum for views on teaching, research and practice. For workshops we invite you to submit ideas with hands-on experiments from the field of civil tech and physical computing.

Exhibition contributions: For the accompanying exhibition, posters, prototypes, videos, objects or other items may be submitted that fit the context of the conference. The entries can be commentaries, approaches to problem solving or documentations of the research and design process. Your submissions should not exceed 500 words and must be submitted as a PDF file to mail@dgtf.de. The deadline for submissions is 31.08.2017. The selection will be made by the conference committee in cooperation with external evaluators. The notification will be sent by 30.09.2017. The “Civic Design” conference will take place on the 1st and 2nd of December 2017. The Burg Giebichenstein, University of Art and Design Halle will host the event. The conference committee consists of Bianca Herlo, Andreas Unteidig and Matthias Görlich. Please contact Malte Bergmann, head of the DGTF secretariat and coordinator of this year’s meeting, with your questions.

Please note the important dates:
31. August: Submission of full papers

30. September: Notification of acceptance

CALL FOR PAPERS Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society

Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society is an international, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal concerned with research on the cultural, social, political and technological histories of the internet and associated digital cultures. The journal embraces empirical as well as theoretical and methodological studies within the field of the history of the internet broadly conceived — from early computer networks, usenet and Bulletin Board Systems, to everyday Internet with the web through the emergence of new forms of internet with mobile phones and tablet computers, social media, and the internet of things. The journal will also provide the premier outlet for cutting-edge research in the closely related area of histories of digital cultures.

A hallmark of the journal is its desire to publish and catalyse research and scholarly debate on the development, forms, and histories of the internet internationally, across the full global range of countries, regions, cultures, and communities. Importantly, the journal draws on a wide range of disciplines within the humanities and the social sciences. Internet Histories will also be open to interdisciplinary studies of history of internet and digital cultures, from computer, information, engineering, and other science and technology researchers.

Contributions might include but not be limited to:

  • History of the internet and the web
  • Web histories
  • History of networks
  • Alternative, marginal, or subcultural histories
  • Feminist, queer, and disability histories
  • Local and regional internet histories
  • Gender and race studies of digital cultures
  • Histories of digital recording, production, distribution, file formats and sharing
  • Internet and digital music and sound histories
  • Infrastructure studies
  • National paths to digitalization
  • Telecommunications and computing convergence
  • History of code, protocols, services, interfaces, graphical representation and interactivity
  • History of online communities
  • History of digital uses, users and cultures
  • Internet governance, regulation and policy history
  • Historical cross-media studies
  • Pedagogy and teaching of internet histories
  • Methodological approaches to study digital and network histories
  • Histories of internet policy, law, and regulation

Submission Guidelines

A typical original article for this journal should be more than 6000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit includes tables; references; figure captions; endnotes. For advice on preparing a manuscript to submit to the Journal, please refer to the Instructions for Authors here.

This journal uses Editorial Manager to manage the peer-review process. If you haven’t submitted a paper to this journal before, you will need to create an account in the submission centre. Submit your paper here.

Editorial Information

Managing Editor
Niels Brügger
 – Aarhus University, Denmark

Editors
Megan Ankerson
 – University of Michigan, USA 
Gerard Goggin – University of Sydney, Australia 
Valérie Schafer – National Center for Scientific Research, France 
Ian Milligan – University of Waterloo, Canada 

Reviews Editor
Ian Milligan
 – University of Waterloo, Canada 

 

 

http://explore.tandfonline.com/page/ah/internet-histories