Category Archives: Seminars

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar / Khalil Klouche & Darius Pacauskas

Welcome everyone to the last doctoral seminar of the semester!

On the 09.05.19, at 16.30-19:30, led by Professor Lily Díaz in Learning Centre, JUHO the doctoral student Khalil Klouche will present his on-going research titled:

Making the Information Space Explorable Through Entity-based Affordances

This talk overviews my doctoral dissertation, which explores an alternative design space of interactions to support everyday information practices.

Starting with a critique of search engines as primary access points to the web, I advocate for greater user awareness and control as well as increased responsibility over what information is encountered. I summarize that goal as making information explorable, and investigate the related design space through the development and  evaluation of various interaction and visualization techniques.

Bio

Khalil Klouche has a Master of Arts degree in Interaction Design and works since 2014 as a researcher at the Computer Science department of University of Helsinki, within Pr. Giulio Jacucci’s Ubiquitous Interaction group. Klouche designs, implements and evaluates novel interfaces for search engine that aim to support information exploration. Also a doctoral candidate at the Aalto Media department, he is the co-author of 13 published articles and the recipient of the 2017 Nokia scholarship.

Guest speaker Darius Pacauskas

 is a recent Postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Art of Aalto University School of Art, Design and Architecture. He is a former Marie-Curie fellow with a computer science and social science background. His interest lies in applying ICT in various areas of research, and publications concentrated on creativity supporting technologies as well as their role in fostering collaboration and societal impact.

 Aesthetics in Two Digital Worlds

(A project by Ossi Naukkarinen and Darius Pacauskas)

Aesthetics is typically seen as a theoretical, especially philosophical academic discipline focusing on questions about art, beauty, the nature of aesthetic experiences, and many other issues related to these. However, there is another, non-academic side of aesthetics where similar issues are addressed, and which is not usually considered in academic context. To investigate how these two areas of aesthetics relate to each other we applied computational text-mining techniques on Wikipedia, Google trends, YouTube, Open Library books and Web of Science datasets. We used topic modelling as a method for analysis, and used Gensim library to implemt it. Firstly, we collected data from the aforementioned sources, either by downloading from a provider, or using API’s, or scraping it with created web robot. Later we created a list of topics covering all the data we gathered, and created a topic map based on English Wikipedia articles. Later on, we imputed each dataset into the generated topic map to identify what are the most discussed topics and to what extent. Imputed datasets were related to aesthetics, e.g. Web of Science dataset included only abstracts and titles from articles that either include a keyword “aesthetics” or are from recognized venues in aesthetics discipline. Such mapping allowed us to avoid some well-known topic modeling problems. For instance, if we had applied topic modelling on separate datasets straight away, we had not been able to compare them due to differently designed topics among datasets, and topics had not been relevant due to the relatively small amount of documents imputed, as topic modelling requires a high amount of documents for informative results. To visualize results we used slightly changed version of Python library called “LDAvis”. Results allowed us to compare both areas of aesthetics and describe wideness of the gap between the two, as well as showcase a digital tool application in the field of aesthetics. This data analysis process was finished on 2017 June and an articles based on it was submitted to an international journal of aesthetics in August 2017.

https://designing-knowledge.siggraph.org/wp/2018/02/21/aesthetics-in-two-digital-worlds/

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar; Environmental Media: a study on the mediation of technology in ecological artistic practices.

On the 25.04.19, at 16.30-19:30, led by Professor Lily Díaz in Learning Centre, JUHO the doctoral student Juan Duarte will present his on-going research titled:

Environmental Media: a study on the mediation of technology in ecological artistic practices

Abstract:

The research aims to work around technologies on location, that are used on open environmental data sensing for intermedia art context. The production of devices aims follow a usability process of Interaction Design focusing on principles of sustainability and maker culture. As an outcome of the research, I expect to collect field experiences active communities Accompanying study cases, the research wants to question the role of media technologies in the field of environmental arts to support the development of both art and science collaborations.

The existing scientific proof of planetary issues such as global warming still seems trivial to an important sector of the population. Thus a data platform for environmentalist art could support scientific research by bringing attention to environmental degradation. Artistic research could help reconcile society with a planetary vision through citizen initiatives that empower us with tools that help with making decisions, such as monitoring pollution levels or mapping relations between technological footprints, and planetary cycles.

Bio:

Mexican-born media artist Juan Duarte Regino works on interaction as a tool for generative art experiments. He is part of Pixelache – art and activist group based in Helsinki. Currently a doctoral student in New Media in Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland, he reflects on the information society paradigm from the point of view of his background in media art, with a special focus on open source technologies developed in DIY communities and grassroots initiatives. Duarte’s work has been presented in IAMAS, Spiral Gallery, Ljudmila, Radio, and TV Museum of Lahti, Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Mänttä Art, Generate! Festival, CTM Festival, Lofoten Sound Art Symposium.

His background is in Audiovisual Communication (Bachelor of Arts), and New Media Arts (Master of Arts). His research is around technologies on location, to be used for open environmental data sensing in an intermedia context. The sensing devices developed follow an Interaction Design process focusing on principles of sustainability and maker culture. The outcome of the research (consisting of workshops, lectures exhibitions, and live media performances) expects to collect field experiences from a community of creators, specialized on potentialities of locative media, in order to serve environmental queries through artistic and scientific procedures.

Guest speaker: Martin Howse

Abstract:

Symbiotic ur-networks of silent fungal and root chatter and earth vibration, named chemical gradients tasted by rooty and human tongues fruit forest-wide in fairy rings, rising up in form and outgrowing Jodrell bank and Arecibo, outclassing them unknown in bringing down the stars to Earth.Martin Howse, 2017

Noting simple parallels between the scaled formations of radio telescope arrays, and the arrayed forms of certain mushroom bodies such as those of Amanita Muscaria, Martin Howse aims to further explore this spored coincidence of cosmos and micro-cosmos, initiating the first forest Radio Mycelium Array.

Conventional radio telescope arrays make use of a technique called interferometry to combine signals received on multiple smaller antennas, creating a larger, more precise view of the electromagnetic Universe. In the case of the RMA, the arrayed Amanita mushrooms act as receiving antennas for deep space signals, to be combined in underground mycelial electrochemical signals. Star dust and mushroom spore combine imaginatively, with both technologies provoking potentially meaningful earth and cosmic signals.

Radio Mycelium Array (RMA) is exhibited both as a speculative prototype (mushroom bodies connected to a digital interferometer device and display), and as documentation of “working” forest studies with similar equipment. Audio recordings of received signals are also available (inscribed on vinyl in sleeves printed with copper spore patterns from the Amanita mushrooms, the antennae).

Bio

Martin Howse’s work spans the fields of computing programming, writing, education and performance. A true explorer of urban scapes, his ideas consider our intimate and embodied relationship with our environment. His work has been received several awards (including first prize at Art & Artificial Life competition VIDA 8.0, 2005) and he has curated and participated in several seminars and performances (ICA, London, Transmediale, Berlin, Tuned City, Berlin & Brussels). In 2006 Martin co-founded xxxxx, organising one large-scale conference and concert series in London (xxxxx) and publishing the acclaimed xxxxx [reader]. From 2007 to 2009 he has hosted a regular workshop, micro-residency and salon series in Berlin, most recently under the banner of _____-micro-research. More recently micro-research has been established as a mobile platform for psychogeophysical research with ongoing projects in London, Peenemuende, Lyme Regis and Berlin. For the last ten years he has collaborated on numerous open-laboratory style projects and performed, published, lectured and exhibited worldwide.

http://1010.co.uk/org

ELO-L0008, (L01) Dialogues with X: Art, Film and Theory Workshop

Course for the doctoral students. Open for also for MA students.

ELO-L0008, (L01) Dialogues with X: Art, Film and Theory Workshop (2 cr).
Responsible teachers: Susanna Helke & Harri Laakso

What happens when a philosopher encounters an artwork? During the course Dialogues with X: Art, Film and Theory Workshop (2 cr) we will explore, through in-depth readings of selected texts, what happens at the intersection of a philosophical text and a contemporary artwork. The emphasis is in cinema and media art. How can the materiality of an artwork be translated into the language of philosophy? What happens in that encounter? What is encountered? The course consists of reading selected texts, viewing films and artworks discussed in the reading materials, and lectures offered by visiting experts. How does artistic research – at the intersection of art and theory – relate to the encounters that occur between philosophy and art?

Wed 27.3

9AM-4PM: Markku Koivusalo: Philosophers’ Encounters with Art.

Wed 3.4

9AM-12PM: Kari Yli-Annala: Gilles Deleuze and Time Image- Capturing the Modern and Contemporary Cinema

1PM-4PM: Film screening.

Fri 5.4.

9AM-10:15 AM: Susanna Helke: Jacques Rancière and Cinematic Ruptures.

10:30AM-4PM: Ivana Momčilović: Jacques Rancière and Modern Times in Cinema.

Wed 10.4

9AM-12PM Harri Laakso: Jean Louis Schefer and the Body That Is Missing.

1PM-4PM Katja Lautamatti: Giorgio Agamben – For Ethics of Cinema.

Wed 17.4

9AM-4PM: The students prepare a presentation with a chosen method reflecting the questions of encountering an art work, formulating their own philosophy of art. They can discuss their own artistic work, artistic processes or a chosen art work by someone else, using dialogically philosophical texts.

(Sign up in weboodi!)

Welcome everyone to the second Media Lab Doctoral Seminar of the year!

On the 28.03.19, at 16.30-19.30, led by Professor Lily Díaz in Learning Centre, JUHO the doctoral student Andrea Mancianti will present his on-going research titled:

The Living Threshold / Altered States. Designing experiences for sustainable audio-visual immersive ecosystems. 

Augmenting our physical world with digital, immaterial, virtual layers, introduces thresholds between the two dimensions, separating, like portholes an inside and an outside, a “here” and an “elsewhere”. Although never fully crossable or completely permeable, these thresholds still allow for exchanges with the other side, like porous, semi-transparent membranes between real and virtual worlds, gateways between two realities. These thresholds reveal and hide at the same time. Their materiality, their appearance, their affordances shape the kind of experience we undergo when  our body interfaces with and extends through such layered realities. Unfortunately, the materiality of these thresholds is often concealed or mystified.

The current technologies for interfacing real and virtual environments (often addressed as Mixed or Extended Realities) are driven by commercial preoccupations, being more and more employed in consumer electronic commodities. The mainstream approach to XR today is characterised by proprietary technologies exposed to extremely rapid obsolescence, black box tools and by a general ideology of novelty that, on the one hand reinforces waste accumulation and consumeristic drives and on the other makes it harder for artists and practitioners to design experiences outside of those paradigms.

In this mainstream scenario technology is designed to disappear, to conceal itself, and the experiences it channels are conceived like visual illusions, where simulation and plausibility are the key ideas, in a well established traditions of cinema and video games. My research, reflecting on the idea of threshold, its materiality, its behaviour, its autonomy, proposes an alternative direction to investigate the design of audio-visual immersive experiences, facing the technical challenges from a DIY, alternative, low-impact perspective. The initial step of this process has been the immersive installation Blindphones, developed in the frame of the joint program Futurelab Academy between the Department of Media, MediaLab and the festival Ars Electronica, Linz.

The idea behind this installation was to re-appropriate some of the key concepts behind VR, such as re-embodiment and immersion, but, abandoning any commercial device and proprietary technology, attempted to reimagine the head mounted display as a form of an almost alien living prosthetics, radically changing our perception providing a glimpse of an alternative embodiment.

Rather than as a tool to fool our senses by providing (some of) them with a credible simulation of the world, conforming the viewer into a normative embodiment, Blindphones, by heavily impairing sight, forces the body to function using hearing, rather than sight,  to articulate sense in a dreamy world made of shifting lights and sound. Inspired by the altered states induced in the sensory deprivation tank, where the body floats weightlessly in a dark quiet environment and the mind shifts from a meditative state up to an hallucinatory one, the project draws from the psychedelic tradition of early VR art and drone music.

Bio

Andrea Mancianti is a composer, performer, sound and media artist. With his work, that include music compositions, installations and mixed media performances, he seeks to investigate compositional and performative aspects of interconnected audiovisual ecosystems, where real-word phenomena extend in the virtual digital world and complex feedback networks are established between the two realm. His works have been performed in Europe and Usa, for institutions such as Ircam (Paris), Biennale Musica (Venice), Impuls and KUG (Graz), Muziekcentrum De Bijloke (Ghent), Centre Henri Pousseur (Liege), STUK (Leuven), Boston University (Boston), Nuova Consonanza (Roma), Sibelius Academy (Helsinki) and others


Guest speaker:

Synes Elischka (Doctoral Candidate Department of Film, Television and Scenography)

EGO CURE: Exploring the liminal space between immersion and self-awareness

My PhD is made up of two equal parts that inform each other: a monograph and an artistic project.

The aim of my monograph is to give audio-visual artists a theoretical and practical basis for using new media technology to tell their stories, while also giving insight into the current context that these media are embedded in.

My artistic project (“Ego Cure”, a cinematic VR experience with enactive elements) is set in a world where the perception of art as a product has come to its logical technological conclusion: the Ego Cure mask is a technical tool that helps artists who get stuck (for example writers block), to continue with their practice.

This has been used to make art more of a commodity, by forcing an artist who is unable or unwilling to provide a commissioned art piece to use the mask.

The plot of the film follows Emma, a choreographer who decides to redo her entire performance a day before the premiere which meets the resistance of the curator.

At the turning point of the story the protagonist is forced to use the EgoCure mask, and we are thrown with her into a world that both literally and conceptually rips open the fourth wall and teases the possibility space of storytelling in Virtual Reality.

The physical experience of the viewer becomes intermeshed with film itself, when Ego Cure introduces enactive elements that support both the theme and the flow of the plot – by making use of the liminal space between immersion and self-awareness.

During the making of my artistic PhD we developed a workflow for creating VR experiences that are sustainable, while reframing existing aesthetics and cinematic conventions to this new medium.

We used current digital cinema cameras and compositing software, which allowed us to adopt conventional working methods, team structures, tools, workflows and aesthetics.

Context of Research

Synes Elischka (AT), Filmmaker/Researcher for VirtualCinemaLab at ELO Film School, Aalto University

If you compare novels and cinema there are certain experiences you can explore in one medium that are impossible in the other. Over the last 120 years cinema kept evolving visual storytelling for example, as a tool that engages both our perception and our imagination.

Since Cinematic Virtual Reality (CVR) is a very young art form it is lacking its own set of storytelling tools. My work provides concepts and a proof of concept (artistic project) which can help artists explore the narrative potential of this new medium and engage their audiences’ imagination.

More information and making-of here: http://virtualcinema.aalto.fi/view/ego-cure-vr-film/

 

New Media Doctoral Seminar, February 28

Welcome everyone to the first Media Lab Doctoral Seminar of the year!
On the 28.02.19, at 16.30-19.30, led by Professor Lily Díaz in Learning Centre, JUHO
the doctoral student Heidi Tikka will present her on-going research titled:
Interactions, Materializations – Notes on Doing Artistic Research

In the contemporary landscape of digital, networked media in which new alliances of power, capital and surveillance continuously invent new platforms for their operations, the modes of commodification that they advance increasingly intervene in the most intimate aspects of our lives. My artistic practice has over the years probed these techno-social shifts by questioning how do these forces operate on and reconfigure what we consider our own: the embodied selves and the domains of experience we inhabit.


My research, which is transdisciplinary, practice based artistic research in conversation with a multiplicity of discourses ranging from cinema studies to science studies and new materialism, focuses on human-machine interface as the conceptual-practical site for inquiring into these new forms of embodied and technological intimacy. The central questions I am working on concern the concept of embodiment: how to conceptualize the human body in and through the experimental, heterogenous labours of media art production on one hand and on the other, how to explore and theorize those different convergent sensorial domains that my installations evoke, particularly the entanglements of the aural and the visual with the different forms of tactility.


Pursuing these questions, I will understand my installations as sites of ongoing human and nonhuman labours, and as events that are performed into being in amalgams of interactions and material transformations. I will address these events as materializations, and will inquire into them by producing extensive accounts of the processes in which my installations were developed, produced and exhibited. These narratives also engage in a series of readings of texts that have shaped the becoming of the installations and which continue to be relevant for this retrospective work. However, when writing, I constantly find my work haunted by the question, what does it mean to frame this work as artistic research. How should I make these installations accountable while acknowledging their agency in this process of knowledge production?

Bio

Installation Mother, Child (2000/2011) at the Wäinö Aaltonen Museum 2014

Heidi Tikka is an artist-researcher, whose artistic production ranges from experimental cinema and media archaeology to participatory projects and interactive installations. Most recently she has inquired into different configurations of touch, for instance in “Herbarium”(2016), a media art work for a large touch screen interface, commissioned by Espoo Library and situated at the Iso Omena Service Center. Her films and installations have been shown in ISEA and Transmediale, as well as in Finnish Museum of Photography, Kiasma and Wäinö Aaltonen Museum.  She is the recipient of the first national AVEK Media Art Award (2004). Her other activities include writing and curating. In the past she has worked as a production consultant for AVEK (2008-2012) and in different teaching positions in Media Lab (former Department of Media, 2001-2007).

For the documentation of Heidi Tikka’s recent work please see
http://heiditikka.com/
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Guest speaker: Annette Arlander (Doctor of Arts, Artist, Researcher, Pedagogue)

The Diversity of Artistic Research

Although the area of artistic research is still contested and many prefer to use other related terms in order to avoid the somehow controversial or paradoxical tone of the term in English, the debates around artistic research have continued long enough for us to acknowledge that something like that can be said to exist, if not as a proper discipline, at least as something resembling it. Instead of asking what artistic research is or means, many prefer to ask, what can it do? What can be done with or within artistic research? Today when interdisciplinarity is increasingly sought for to complement the ever-narrowing disciplinary expertise, the possibility of a meeting ground or a (relatively) free space for various disciplines to interact offered by artistic research is needed more than ever. Moreover, the aspect of experimentation and play with alternatives, artistic research as a speculative practice is more and more valued within Academia as well as in society at large. What seems to be the most obvious result of the debates and demonstrations so far is the diversity of the field today.

In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of artistic research through examples of my own practice, in the project Performing with Plants.

An example of a recent publication “Resting with Pines in Nida – attempts at performing with plants”.

http://www.performancephilosophy.org/journal/article/view/232

Bio

Annette Arlander, DA, is an artist, researcher and pedagogue. Previously professor of performance art and theory at Theatre Academy Helsinki (2001-2013), professor of artistic research at University of the Arts Helsinki (2015-2016), postdoctoral fellow at Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies (2017), she is presently professor of performance, art and theory at Stockholm University of the Arts (2018-2019), visiting researcher at Academy of Fine Arts, Uniarts Helsinki, PI of the Academy of Finland funded research project How to do things with performance? and the Swedish Research Council funded artistic research project Performing with Plants.

Still image from a video work From the series: “Year of the Dog in Lill-Jans’Wood’ Filmed during 2018 in Stockholm

For artworks and publications, see https://annettearlander.com

 

New Media Doctoral Seminar, December 13

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar (Christmas gathering)
TIME: Thursday December 13, 2018, from 16:30–19:30
LOCATION: Aalto University, Learning Centre, room JUHO.

DOM-L0007 New Media Doctoral Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

PRESENTATIONS BY:
Guest speaker: Priscilla Ferronato (Illinois Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign)
Massimo Menichinelli

See abstracts below.

 

The seminar is open for all in Aalto University. Welcome!


 

A transitory approach to post-human centered design: understanding the users’ perception of trust in open and decentralized technologies

by Priscilla Ferronato

The development of technologies like AI and ML, the rise of new forms of human-computer interaction, and the consolidation of areas of study like STS and posthumanism theories have been supporting the disruption of traditional design approaches. Moreover, open and decentralized networks, in addition to data, can be used to better understand society as part of a complex socio-technical system. However, the understanding, anticipation, and design of the dynamics of socio-technical systems, require a perspective beyond human-centered design. By investigating the human perception of trust in open and decentralized technologies and the dynamics of the interaction between humans and non-humans actors, this research aims to explore a new post-human centered design methodology for designing, researching and communicating transparent intelligent systems based on decentralized networks where both non-human and human actors are active agents that base their work and interactions on trust.

Priscilla Ferronato is a Ph.D. candidate in the Illinois Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, holds a Master of Science in Strategic Design, and her research focus is on the intersection of technology, design, and society. She is a User Experience Research at Synchrony Financial, one of the biggest corporate credit card provider in the USA, where she has been working on the implementation of a customer experience research center for the development and adoption of emerging technologies. As part of her Ph.D. dissertation, she has been using a mixed method approach to understand the users’ perception of trust in open and decentralized technologies, like blockchain and open governmental data.

 


A research through design approach for exploring meta-design tools and practice for the organizing of Open and Collaborative Design and Making processes.

by Massimo Menichinelli

The design research and practice have recently been investigating how to
have an active role in enabling collaborative and distributed systems
through the analysis, visualization and design of their collaborative
tools, platforms, processes and organizations. By adopting a meta-design
perspective, new possibilities have emerged for designers to be active
agents in the organization and management of collaborative and
distributed processes, especially design and making ones. How can be
collaborative design processes documented, analysed, managed, shared?
This research presents a research through design frameworks that
connects both practice and research, data formats and digital platforms,
researches and experiments for exploring the role and nature of
meta-design and meta-designers in facilitating collaborative design
processes starting from their description with digital ontologies.

Massimo Menichinelli: designer, has published several scientific
articles and books on the topics of Open Design, Makers and Fab Labs and
has lectured on Digital Fabrication and Open Design at Aalto University
(Helsinki, Finland) and Open Design at SUPSI (Lugano, Switzerland) and
in the Fab Academy (Opendot and WeMake, Italy). Massimo worked on the
development of the Aalto FabLab, the MUSE Fab Lab (Trento, Italy), the
Opendot makerspace/Fab Lab (Milan, Italy). He worked also as a Director
at Make In Italy Italian Fablab & Makers Foundation CDB where he
researched and facilitated Fab Labs and Makers in Italy. He works now as
a project manager for research projects at IAAC | Fab City Research Lab,
especially in the MAKE-IT and SISCODE Horizon 2020 European project and
as a coordinator of the Creative Europe platform programme Distributed
Design Market Platform and as project manager of Fablabs.io, the
official and open source platform for the global Fab Lab Network.

New Media Doctoral Seminar, November 22

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday November 22, 2018, from 16:30–19:30
LOCATION: Aalto University, Learning Centre, room JUHO.

DOM-L0007 New Media Doctoral Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

PRESENTATIONS BY:
Marjaana Veermans (University of Turku), guest speaker
Eva Durall

See abstracts below.

The seminar is open for all in Aalto University. Welcome!


 

Development of computational thinking, scientific reasoning and interest through art and design practices

by Marjaana Veermans

Abstract: Marjaana’s talk will explore how art and design processes can be implemented in interdisciplinary learning settings that will engage students in science practices. People’s general alertness, for instance, on health and nutrition topics, show that people are interested in reading and learning science when it comes to issues that relate to their daily lives. The concept of interest can explain why people want to engage in these topics and learn from them. In school context students should be guided to transform their practical problems into scientific questions and to translate science back into practical solutions. Integrating science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) with art and design (STEAM), provides a concrete solution for creating science learning environments in which students’ existing interests can be better taken into consideration than in traditional science learning by creating student initiated design activities. In art and design learning the focus is on creating artifacts. This can be a way to move from the emphasis of content knowledge in science learning to the direction of learning how to do science. In addition, art and design are process oriented and solution driven.

Bio: Marjaana Veermans is an Associate professor and a Collegium Research Fellow in the Department of Teacher Education in the University of Turku. Her area of expertise is on motivational aspects of learning environments. The methodological expertise of Veermans is in design experiments and conducting research in authentic classrooms, combining both quantitative and qualitative sets of data. Both her Ph.D. project and her postdoctoral project funded by Academy of Finland have been complex longitudinal research projects. She has also been involved as the responsible investigator in numerous EC-funded longitudinal research and developmental projects as well as national ones.


 

Reflection and Self-Regulation Using Monitoring Tools in Learning
– Critical Design Exploration on Self-Monitoring During Independent Study

By: Eva Durall

Abstract: Monitoring technologies enable the automatic collection and analysis of data to provide feedback about diverse activities and processes. Despite these technologies are increasingly present in different contexts of human life, for instance in the quantified-self movement, in learning, monitoring tools are still an emerging technology. To date, most approaches to use monitoring tools in learning have focused on finding application areas without problematizing the context of use. Little attention has been paid to issues like the nature of data and the inferences that are made based on them, the role of students in learning, and the conception of learning and technology. This presentation addresses this research gap and provides an understanding of the issues related to the design of monitoring tools and the adoption of techno-monitoring practices in learning.

Bio: Eva Durall is a Ph.D. candidate at LeGroup and holds a MA in ePedagogy and Visual Knowledge Building (Aalto University). Her doctoral research is focused on the design of learning tools that, informed by critical pedagogy postulates, help learners develop awareness and reflect about their learning process. Main research interests are connected to monitoring technologies, self-monitoring, reflection, self-regulation and critical design.

 

Getting by: Negotiating Future Livelihoods in the Arts

A Symposium organised by Kiasma, University of the Arts Helsinki, University of Helsinki and Aalto University.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
at 10:00 – 14:00
Kiasma Theatre
Free entrance

This symposium addresses the future of the artists’ livelihood. Hosted by Kiasma, and co-organised by Uniarts Helsinki, Aalto University and the University of Helsinki, the event focuses on the rapid changes in contemporary society and new affordances that those changes introduce for the professionals working in the arts field. The precarious work market suggests new roles for arts professionals and their education, but also opens up new opportunities for art researchers to probe into the complexities of the late modern society, culture and working life. These and other questions around artists’ future livelihood, along with questions of societal responsibility, are discussed during the symposium.

The symposium invites artists, art-related researchers, art educators, art students, and other stakeholders interested in the artist’s livelihood on Tuesday November 13, 2018, 10 am – 2 pm, at the Kiasma Theatre. Participation is free of charge.

The symposium language is English.

From: Uniarts.fi website

New Media Doctoral Seminar, October 25

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday October 25, 2018, from 16:30–19:30
LOCATION: Aalto University, Learning Centre, room JUHO.

DOM-L0007 New Media Doctoral Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

PRESENTATIONS BY:
Guest speaker: Tone Andersen
Mamdooh Afdile
Daniel Landau

See abstracts below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


The neglected question of telling the life story of someone else

by Tone Andersen

My name is Tone Andersen and I’m a Norwegian cinematographer and filmmaker. Many of the films and programs I have worked on has been about strangers from a different country, a different culture, whom often speak a language I didn’t master. In countries like Palestine, Pakistan, Thailand, Kongo, Afghanistan and Somaliland I have been continuously facing the challenge of finding the way to tell their personal stories for a Western audience. Though the familiar reality to many documentarists worldwide, this is a question often not problematized. What are the advantages and disadvantages of coming in as a foreign filmmaker? Can a foreigner ever tell a local story in an authentic way? Through examples of projects I’ve worked, I will give a short talk presenting my personal reflections and the challenges in dramatizing the lives of others with a focus on the foreign setting.

Tone Andersen: After graduating from SIADUK, she started out as a camerawoman in the Middle-East in 2002. Since then she has worked as a cinematographer, director, producer and editor in various formats world-wide. She has shot award-winning stories on social and human rights concerns from Asia, Africa, the US, the Middle-East and Europe. Her debut documentary as a director; When the Boys Return premiered in IDFA in 2012 and won several prizes at festivals around the world. In 2016 Andersen and her partner Mamdooh Afdile founded their own production company, Klar Film. There Andersen currently works as a producer and screenwriter, developing ideas for TV-series and film.

–––  –––

When it comes to us, we are different, but when it comes to them,
They are all the same!

by Mamdooh Afdile

The unspoken truth about our prejudice and negative attitude toward others left psychologists and researchers stand puzzled on how to investigate a behavior that many are ashamed to admit. We tend to “keep our thoughts to ourselves” when we suspect that the surrounding might be judgmental or dismissing. This behavior have caused a challenge to investigating negative emotions toward others. In this short talk I will present my work in trying to address this limitation by combining movie viewing with brain imaging methodology. The brain doesn’t lie when it comes to what it likes and what not.

Mamdooh Afdile graduated from the Sam Spiegel Film & Television School in Jerusalem in 2005. He has extensive experience in producing, directing, shooting and editing film and TV programs in a wide variety, from NGO advocacy films, reality TV shows, to feature films. Afdile has also worked as a film lecturer and consultant. As well as developing ideas for KlarFilm, he currently a doctoral candidate in media and neuroscience at Aalto University in Finland.

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by Daniel Landau

From Narcissus’s pond through reflective surfaces and modern age selfies, the concepts of self, body-image, and self-awareness have been strongly influenced by the human interaction with reflective technologies. As digital media pervasively enters our lives, a new dimension of self-documentation becomes a major force in shaping the conception of the narrative-self. With the current wave of Virtual Reality technology making its early steps as a consumer product, Media artist Daniel Landau, set out to explore the new ways in which VR impacts our concepts of self and self-awareness; and the opportunities and challenges that re-embodiment in VR brings to the way we perceive the ‘self’ in relation to ‘others’. In his lecture, Daniel Landau will map the empirical studies he has designed comprising his Doctoral research.

Daniel Landau is a media artist, researcher, and lecturer. He studied Computer Music and New Media at the Royal Conservatory in The Netherlands. Residing at the intersection of Art, Technology, and Science, Landau’s work explores the Impact of virtual embodiment on the construct of the Self. His work has been presented in major venues, museums, and festivals worldwide including Jerusalem, New-York, London, Amsterdam, Berlin, Shenzhen, Tokyo, Paris, and Mexico City. Daniel is regularly invited to give talks about his art and science projects in institutions and festivals worldwide, among them are CalTech, Stanford University, UCLA, University of Copenhagen, Aalto University. Between 2012 and 2016, Daniel led the Media Studies department at the Midrasha Faculty of the Arts, and since 2014 he lectures at the Interdisciplinary Centre, Herzliya. Daniel was recently invited to UCLA as a visiting lecturer and he is currently a doctoral candidate at the Aalto University Media Lab, Finland.