Category Archives: New Media

Lily Díaz’s presentation at Workshop IEEE ISMAR 2017 in Nantes

Professor in New Media and Head of Research at the Department of Media in Aalto University Lily Díaz-Kommonen is presenting a paper at Workshop IEEE ISMAR 2017: VR and AR meet Creative Industries on October 13th in Nantes, France.

Interactive Diorama: A virtual reality (VR) reconstruction of The Anatomy Lesson of Doctor Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, 1632

Abstract: This document describes some aspects of a design and research project undertaken during the years 2013–2017 by the Systems of Representation research group in the Department of Media at Aalto University in Finland. The objective of the work has been to create an interactive diorama based on the painting The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp. The diorama concept comprises a virtual reality simulation of the artwork in which several of the characters in the painting are re-created as 3D avatars and combined with other audiovisual media including sound and video. Using the HTC-Vive virtual reality system as interface, it is possible for a guest in an exhibition to extent enter the space of the painting itself and to interact with the characters. It is intended that the diorama will be displayed in diverse venues and to a large variety of audiences. This implies a challenge for which there is a need to develop new design knowledge. In this essay I argue that information architecture (IA) can be used in the structuring of the participant’s experience as well as in the organizing and management of contents.

See more: http://ismar-creativeindustries.polytech.univ-nantes.fr/index.html

 

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar October 26

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday October 26, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Jane Vita and Jihye Lee. See abstracts below.


servicesandox_assets

Co-creating digital experiences for places

A multilayered and multidisciplinary view on designing for hybrid services, digital and physical, to empower experiences and build conversations in between people and places.

by Jane Vita

Abstract: Technology in the physical environment can be the elephant in the room when poorly implemented. To better understand how well technology fits into different physical environments, it is necessary not only to discover the right moment to bring digital to space and understand the customer’s needs but also have the multidisciplinary experts involved in its concept creation; working together to achieve the desired goals.

This research aims to help professionals understand the role of technology in places and to give them tools that could meaningfully maximise technology’s role. This study will focus on building a user-centered framework that utilizes concept layers as the groundwork.

The framework will have a significant focus on experience and technology. The layers will be a reproduction of what factors are essential to consider when designing hybrid services, combining physical and digital. The research will result in the production of a user-centered framework, a toolkit and utilization guide for designing better places for a hybrid environment.

To start experimenting, Jane has created the Service Sandbox method and toolkit, and together with few colleagues, she has applied the tool to the context of Smart Living. She has facilitated few workshops with professionals and in conferences around the world. More about Service Sandbox: http://www.servicesandbox.net

jane_picJane Vita – Brazilian living in Finland – Service Design Lead at Digitalist and Ph.D. student at Aalto, New media, LeGroup.

Over the past 19 years, I’ve had the opportunity to gain experience in many of the design competencies, with projects in a range of different industries. At Digitalist I’m facilitating internal and external dialogue around the service design practice area. In client projects, my role is to act as a lead consultant helping customers to discover their digital future. These projects vary from extensive discovery to design sprints.

I conduct a Service Design in Digital Context course lectures in the Service Innovation and Design program at Laurea University. I’m also a Ph.D. student at Aalto University, together with Learning Environments Research Group I get involved in research, design, and development of New Media tools, as well as their use and application, in the field of learning.

Co-creation is an integral part of my work as service design. There are countless tools out there available to map experiences, describe paths and journeys, but what I needed was a tool to explore, play freely and in an open environment and the context of a place. I have experienced many design tools, and I even gave workshops at ISA14, Interaction 16 and Interaction 17 around the topic of Intelligent Spaces. However, together with few colleagues and as part of my research and with the client permission, I’m creating a Service Sandbox to prototype “smart experiences,” along with different canvases to map and validate the value the services would bring for the customers.

More about Jane: http://www.janevita.com


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(Image Courtesy : The CHESS Project)

Investigating User Experience(UX) Factors in Digital Heritage

by Jihye Lee

Abstract: Digital Heritage presented by augmented/virtual reality technology offers audiences entry to spaces that are difficult to access physically or in time such as the past. Since digital technology has emerged significantly, digital heritage realm seems blossom accordingly. However, a question that emerges is: when digital heritage experience is planned, what elements of user experience(UX) should be considered? The UX might be differently designed in accordance with the heritage’s characteristics or its goal.

Investigating recent digital heritage works, the researcher will analyze them in a point of factors of user experience and argue that each different UX brings different effects for audiences. Conversely, different goal in designing digital heritage should have different UX approach. In this sense, the researcher attempts to categorize the works of digital heritage by its UX approach, and explore its characteristics in details. Throughout the analysis, further study and implementation can be expected for designers who build digital heritage experience to consider more precise and effective UX factors at the early stage of the design process.

Screen Shot 2017-10-11 at 12.01.45Jihye Lee is a visiting researcher at the Department of Media at Aalto University, and a recent PhD graduate in Film and Digital Media Design at the Hong Ik University, Seoul, South Korea. Her PhD thesis was about participatory process in mobile Augmented Reality with anthropological approach. She has worked in cultural institutions and colleges with interest in interactive storytelling and participatory design. Due to recent participation in digital heritage museum project in Korea, she has begun to focus on designing in digital heritage sector.

HELDIG DI­GITAL HU­MAN­IT­IES SUM­MIT 2017

Oct 18, 2017, 9:00–18:00  (Wednesday)

University of Helsinki, Main Building, Small Hall (Pieni juhlasali), 4050
Fabianinkatu 33, Helsinki, FINLAND

Helsinki Centre for Digital Humanities (HELDIG) was launched by a kick-off symposium on Oct 6, 2016 that was attended by some 200 friends of Digital Humanities. HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 provides a snapshot of activities within the centre and its collaboration network after the first year of operation, facilitating networking and sharing results within the Finnish community of Digital Humanities research and education and beyond.

PRO­GRAMME
After opening the Summit, the first presentation slot of the day contains talks from the seven faculties of the University of Helsinki involved in the HELDIG initiative. After this, presentations from collaborating organizations of the HELDIG network are heard. After the lunch, talks about projects, research, and applications underway are given.

After the presentations, there is a networking event based on posters and demos in the lobby, with nibbles and cocktails served.

SEE MORE: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/helsinki-centre-for-digital-humanities/heldig-digital-humanities-summit-2017

RE­GIS­TRA­TION
Participation in HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 is open and free, but registration is required for catering.

Register here Tuesday 10th October latest :

https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/81397/lomake.html

 

ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)

Special Issue on Evaluation of Digital Cultural Resources

Guest Editors
Maria Economou, University of Glasgow, UK
Ian Ruthven, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK
Areti Galani, University of Newcastle, UK
Milena Dobreva, UCL Qatar
Marco de Niet, University of Leiden Library, The Netherlands


Scope and Context

Digital technologies are affecting all aspects of our lives, reshaping the way we communicate, learn, and approach the world around us. In the case of cultural institutions, digital applications are used in all key areas of operation, from documenting, interpreting and exhibiting the collections to communicating with diverse audience groups. The communication of collections information in digital form, whether an online catalogue, mobile application, museum interactive or social media exchange, increasingly affects our cultural encounters and shapes our perception of cultural organizations. Although cultural and higher education institutions around the world are heavily investing on digitization and working to make their collections available online, we still know very little about who uses digital collections, how they interact with the associated data, and what the impacts of these digital resources are.

The issue seeks to address this gap by bringing together interested parties from a range of disciplines (e.g. digital heritage, museology, information studies, digital humanities), practices and sectors to discuss the latest developments on evaluating the use of cultural digital resources.

Topics and Themes

The issue will appeal to academics and practitioners working in a range of disciplines: cultural heritage workers, arts professionals and scholars interested in issues relating to digital resources and their impact upon curation, education, engagement and outreach. We invite submissions of both theoretical and practical approaches, efforts and trends in this emergent field presenting innovative research. Topics and issues to be addressed include but are not limited to:

  • Who uses digital cultural resources, where, and how these resources changed the consolidated working practice
  • Addressing diverse users’ needs and expectations (i.e. from schoolchildren and families to students and researchers)
  • Assessing impact, use and value of digital cultural resources (methodologies, approaches and issues)
  • Ways of recording and assessing impact and value
  • Models of access to digital collections
  • Evaluating participatory models of work in digital cultural heritage (crowdsourcing, citizen science, co-creation, co-curation)
  • Moving from impact to value when assessing digital resources
  • Use of evaluation data in the curation of digital collections
  • Integrating evaluation when working with communities in digital cultural heritage
  • Adapting old and testing new innovative methods when evaluating quality, use and effectiveness of digital cultural resources
  • User studies
  • Metrics, webmetrics, infometrics and usage statistics
  • Evaluating emotional impact in digital heritage
  • Research on impact of social media on the usage of digital cultural resources

Organizers

The idea for this special issue arose from the activities of the Scottish Network on Digital Cultural Resources Evaluation (ScotDigiCH) (scotdigich.wordpress.com/), funded by The Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2015-2016, and particularly from the discussions and papers presented at the International Symposium on Evaluating Digital Cultural Resources (EDCR2016) which took place in Glasgow in December 2016 (scotdigich.wordpress.com/events/symposium/). ScotDigiCH is coordinated by Information Studies at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with The Hunterian at the University of Glasgow, Glasgow Life Museums, the Moving Image Archive of the National Library of Scotland and the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Strathclyde.

This focused issue arises from the work of ScotDigiCH but invites submissions from all researchers and cultural heritage practitioners working in this area.

Paper Submission

Papers submitted to this special issue for possible publication must be original and must not be under consideration for publication in any other journal or conference. Previously published or accepted conference papers must contain at least 30% new material to be considered for the special issue.

Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage. Papers will be reviewed following the journal’s standard review process. Please follow the format instructions for the journal (jocch.acm.org/authors.cfm). All manuscripts must be prepared according to the journal publication guidelines which can also be found on the website provided above.

All papers are to be submitted at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jocch. Upon submission, under “Article Type”, please select “Evaluation of Digital Cultural Resources” or your manuscript will not be reviewed correctly for the special issue.

Please address inquiries to Maria.Economou@glasgow.ac.uk.

Important Dates

  • Paper submission deadline: November 30, 2017
  • First Author Notification: January 30, 2018
  • Revised papers expected: March 30, 2018
  • Final acceptance notification: May, 2018
  • Publication: Issue 4, 2018

 

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar September 21, 2017

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday September 21, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Yrjö Tuunanen and Pirkka Åman. See abstracts below.


Yrjö Tuunanen: Narrative Transparency in Web-Based Multimodal News Discourse

Abstract: The development of information and communication technologies provides innovative ways for compiling multimodal news accounts. Ideally, new narrative structures offer productive ways for media professionals to report complex issues and mechanisms in society, politics, and economy supporting comprehensible, proportional and contextualized journalism.

For news audience, knowledge on potential of digital news storytelling, as well as transparency within journalistic processes and accounts, is increasingly important in the era of the expansion of (audio)visual news dissemination (Pew Research Center 2014), “fake” and “real” news phenomena, as well as diverse media platforms redelivering filtered news feeds and facilitating discussion on current topics.

This dissertation focuses on the ways in which phototexts and other multimodal news compilations implement transparency within their narrative structures and practices. Moreover, this dissertation discusses the potential of narrative transparency, not yet deployed within multimodal news narration. Accordingly, it suggests additional ways for supporting transparent and contextualized news dissemination and advancing news discourse skills for media audience.

This research is based on studies on narration (Abbott 2008; Herman; 2007; Ryan 2007, 2014) including sociological (Somers & Gibson 1994) and psychological (Bruner 1986, 1990, 1991) perspectives on narrative. It builds on theories of multimodality (Kress and Leeuwen 2006; O´Halloran 2011; Page 2010), and on literature on civic voice and culture (Couldry 2010; Dahlgren 2011). Furthemore, it draws on theories of narrative paradigm (Fisher 1999), news frames and news narratives (Johnson-Cartee 2005) as well as literature on media studies (Baudrillard 1994; Chouliaraki 2008; Massumi 2010).

This dissertation contributes to discussions on the paradigmatic shift from objectivity tradition toward transparency norm in journalism (Hellmueller et al. 2013; Karlsson 2010; Kovach & Rosenstiel 2014; Shcudson 2001). Among scholars, transparency has been discussed as “the new objectivity” and defined in terms of 1) disclosure transparency and 2) participatory transparency (Karlsson 2010). This thesis brings a new perspective to this field by focusing on narrative transparency, a rhetorical aspect of transparency, that has not been studied and discussed thoroughly in journalism studies.

See PDF for full list of references.

YT_portraitYrjö Tuunanen is a doctoral candidate in Media Lab. His dissertation studies multimodal news narratives. He holds a master’s degree in Photography from University of Industrial Arts, Helsinki, and since 1990, he has worked as a photojournalist and a teacher of digital and documentary photography. From 2013 onwards, he has worked as a consultant on digital visualisation of financial news and information for the Ministry of Finance, Finland. Together with Heidi Hirsto, D.Sc. (Econ.), he has been running a collaborative research project titled: M-Scopes, Mediated Significations of Finance, focusing on the ways in which economic phenomena and mechanisms are represented in the web-based news media.


Pirkka Åman: Musical serendipity – Designing for contextual music recommendation and discovery

Abstract: Online content services commonly offer personalized content such as books, TV series and music that are tailored to the users’ personal preferences. Online music recommendation services are a subset of personalizable services. As music preferences vary greatly across music listening situations, information about the user’s situation, that is, context information has recently been started to involve in recommendations.

In this thesis, I suggest new ways of including context information, mainly location, to music recommendations by presenting concepts and prototypes that were field tested with real-life users. In the articles, I presented two prototypes, Sounds of Helsinki (Article II) and OUTMedia (Article IV), as well as a platform platform for several context-aware music service concepts (Article III). Furthermore, two articles reviewed the existing music services for their explanations and transparency (Article I) and the ways they involved context factors in interacting with music recommendation and discovery tasks.

The underlying argument and a starting point for the thesis was that by involving context factors, ultimately cultural diversity could be fostered. In an ideal case, adding context to music recommendations would lead to recommendations that offer more non-mainstream music than channels such as the playlist radio or playlists of new releases of online music services. That would lead to better chances for serendipitous discoveries, and, ultimately, given that the user base would be large enough, would promote cultural diversity as well.

While the results show that the users indeed experienced serendipity in many ways, in the light of the results it can not be proven that context-aware music recommendations necessarily lead to cultural diversity. In addition, the results can not be generalized to all context-aware music recommendation cases. Instead, design implications are given to help designers and researches of future systems to build rewarding and enjoyable context-aware content services, especially to enrich the urban environments. These include Supporting open meaning-making through combinations of different media content and places; Visual and interactive UI elements that communicate the system logic or explain why a recommendation was made; Positive restrictions: for example, with location-sensitivity as a positive restriction, allowing the content to be available only when the user is at or nearby a certain location; Supporting serendipity can be approached in many ways, for example, combining music with an activity, a location, certain time or an identity can effectively promote serendipitous discoveries.

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 11.20.01Pirkka Åman is a post-graduate student at Media Lab Helsinki, School of Art, Design and Architecture, Aalto University. In his doctoral dissertation he studies how to support music discovery and recommendation in urban environments through ubiquitous interfaces.

Pawlicka

Open lecture at Media Lab

Welcome to an open lecture

The Laboratory Turn in the Humanities

by Dr. Urszula Pawlicka
Visiting Researcher in Media Lab
Department of Media, Aalto University

3 October 2017, from 13:00–14:00
Department of Media, Aalto ARTS
Miestentie 3, Otaniemi, 4th floor, room 426

The humanities has made significant conceptual shifts that include fostering strong innovative and collaborative research, employing technologies, and building a bridge between the academy, industry, and community. Above changes mean designing and defining the humanities anew. Creating an academic discipline requires an ‘administrative imagination’; that is to say we must build a structure aligned with development strategy. Consequently, the humanities has undergone an ‘infrastructure turn’ over the past ten years and launched a new physical place: a laboratory. The emergence of labs in the humanities has been crucial for “redefining the role of the humanities” and “re-configuration of the humanities offered by computational technologies”; however, the proliferation and the fragmentation of labs have led to a state of emergency when it becomes urgent to investigate their significance, objectives, and impact.

The goal of the presentation is to analyze three aspects of the humanities labs: its impetus, implementation, and impact. The first part aims to trace a history of the humanities labs, covering the impulse and the mechanism of their creation. This section includes also mapping out laboratories in the humanities established all over the world. The second part presents the complex landscape of the laboratories in the humanities, launched in various ways as a physical research lab, a makerspace, a virtual network, a community project, etc. The last part examines the features of laboratories that significantly reconfigure the humanities seen as an innovative, digital technology-based field, hands-on experimental research, situated practice, engaged in community affairs, and collaborating with local companies.

Urszula Pawlicka is a visiting researcher in Media Lab Helsinki at Aalto University. She obtained her Doctorate degree in Literary Studies at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (2016). She participated in the following international conferences and scholarships: “The Making of the Humanities VI” at the University of Oxford (2017), the American Comparative Literature Association’s Annual Meeting at Harvard University (2016), Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria (2014), Fulbright Scholarship in Creative Media and Digital Culture at Washington State University Vancouver, WA, US (2014/2015), and fellowship in English Department at Stony Brook University, NY, US (2015). Over the years, she has published peer-reviewed scholarly articles (“English Studies”, “CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture”, and “Teksty Drugie”) and two monographs, including Literatura cyfrowa. W stronę podejścia procesualnego (Electronic Literature: Towards Processual Approach) released this month. Her current research interests include the infrastructure and conceptual transformations in the humanities, digital humanities, and the sociology of scientific knowledge.

urszulapawlicka.com

Call-for-Works._31.08

Designing Knowledge

Aalto University, Department of Media and ACM SIGGRAPH would like to invite you and your community to take part in Designing Knowledge online exhibition.

We encourage unique submissions that present different ways of ‘thinking and doing things in knowledge production and design’.

We welcome works describing how digital archives are used in activities that involve the creation, dissemination, transformation, and sharing of knowledge on a wide variety of topics such as:

• Digital Arts and Computer Graphics
• Digital Humanities
• Sciences

Submissions must include at least 10 keywords that accurately describe the work and areas of knowledge and activity.

Final deadline on the 30th of September

For more information please visit: https://designing-knowledge.siggraph.org/wp

Reimagining video conferencing – a design workshop with MIT MediaLab and Aalto MediaLab

Reimagining video conferencing is a co-design workshop aiming to create alternative solutions for virtual panel discussions, video conferencing and other kinds of group meetings online. In this participatory session we will think and discuss about user experiences for a tool that would extend user engagement over physical location and achieve a rich ecology for participation online. The layout and user interface of a tool for group video conferencing would be challenged and reimagined also. This event is organised and led by the Learning Environments research group in MediaLab, department of Art, design and architecture, Aalto University, FI in collaboration with MIT Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
It is free and open for participation for students and non-students.

Sign up by sending an email to jana.pejoska@aalto.fi including your name, department, study focus, skills (design, development, etc.) and a short description why you are applying.
Thu 14 September
13:30-16:30
Johanna, Learning Centre
Public event

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Journal for Artistic Research (JAR)

The deadline for consideration is 15 September 2017

JAR publishes artistic research from all arts disciplines, with or without academic affiliation, and includes the work of artistic research practitioners and theorists. Rethinking the traditional journal format, JAR offers its contributors a free-to-use online space called the Research Catalogue (RC) where text can be woven together with image, audio and video material. The Journal is specifically interested in contributions that reflect upon and expose artistic practice as research, and welcomes submissions from artists interested in exchanging ideas and opening up the processes and methodologies that underlie their practice. Please view our archive to get a sense of what we publish.

To be considered for Peer Review, the editorial board considers:

1. Whether the exposition exposes artistic practice as research. This engages with questions and claims about knowledge within practice. For a detailed articulation of this please read the editorial to JAR0

http://www.jar-online.net/issue-0

2. The degree to which the exposition is conceptually and artistically strong, considered, and significant to the field.

3. Whether the multimedia and design capacities of the RC have been used effectively and meaningfully to support the argument or understanding of the research.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account on the RC and use the online space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit:

www.jar-online.net/submissions/

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, at submissions@jar-online.net

JAR works with an international editorial board and a large panel of peer-reviewers.

Editor in Chief: Michael Schwab

Peer Review Editor: Julian Klein

Editorial Board: Alex Arteaga, Annette Arlander, Sher Doruff, Barnaby Drabble, Mika Elo, Leonella Grasso Caprioli, Yara Guasque, Julian Klein and Mareli Stolp.

JAR is published by the Society for Artistic Research (SAR)

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/society-for-artistic-research

an independent, non-profit association. You can support JAR by becoming an individual or institutional member of SAR. More information can be found here

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/membership/membership-schemes
Contact: jar@jar-online.net