Category Archives: New Media

Media Lab DA Seminar: Guest lecture by Prof. Dagny Stuedahl

Welcome to an open guest lecture:

Prof. Dagny Stuedahl, OsloMet – city university (Norway), Department of Journalism and Media studies:

Making dialogues work

Time: Thursday January 18, 2018, 4pm–6pm
Location: Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Johanna meeting room, 1st floor

This guest lecture is part of Media Lab DA Seminar at the Department of Media but open for everyone interested!

Warmly welcome!

More information:

This presentation will describe a participatory exhibition design prosess including public hearings, interviews, and round table sessions related to the exhibition FOLK which opens at Norwegian Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine (NTM) in March 2018. Also a participatory project used methods from participatory design ( PD)  for a year long process involving a group of 9 multiethnic young people to discuss identity, ethnicity and belonging. The goal of the participatory process was originally to design engaging activities for young people related to the theme of the exhibition, race and ethnicity, but ended with making a participatory sound installation that will become part of the exhibition.

The particiaptory process became part of research and communication activities of the curatorial study, which compared contemporary views on ethnicity with perspectives in historical racial science and contemporary research on human biological variation and their multiple entanglements with society, culture, economy, politics, and technology. Hence, the curatorial research interweave understandings of individual and group identities with broader political and ethical issues such as concerns on migration, the rise of racist and discriminatory attitudes, or indigenous peoples rights.

The way the curatorial research focus shaped the participatory process, and the way the young people where at each workshop responded to the current state of the curatorial work with the exhibition will be the main focus of the presentation. The museum did paralell to the participatory design process arrange multiple encounters through diverse communication formats including, focus-group workshops, public lectures, and hearings, and the presentation will reflect on the outcome from each of these compared to the longterm collaboration in the youth participation project.

NTM has earlier developed a record of research-based exhibitions and activities and has methodically been investigating the integration of research with communication and management of cultural heritage. Meanwhile, the participatory design proces was new to them, and the presentation will describe how the museum professionals approached the method, and how they integrated a participatory thinking in their curatorial reflections.

See: stuedahl.no

Welcome!


DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Defence in the field of New Media: MA Sanna Marttila

The dissertation examines the ways in which Participatory Design (PD) and digital design endeavors can contribute to wider public access to, and use of, digital cultural heritage.

FRIDAY 19 JANUARY 2018, 12:00–14:00
Aalto University TÖÖLÖ CAMPUS

Nokia Hall, Main Building, 2nd floor
Runeberginkatu 14-16, 00560, Helsinki

MA, M.Phil. Sanna Marttila will defend her thesis Infrastructuring for Cultural Commons.

Opponent: Dr.polit Dagny Stuedahl, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA)

Custos: prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Discussion will be in English.


More information:

In her doctoral dissertation Infrastructuring for Cultural Commons Sanna Marttila inquires into the ways in which Participatory Design (PD) and digital design endeavors can contribute to wider public access to, and use of, digital cultural heritage. Marttila advocates for an approach according to which digital cultural heritage is arranged and understood as cultural commons, and for more collaborative modes of social care for and governance of the cultural commons.

In addition to the empirically grounded findings and proposals contained in six individual research articles, Marttila develops a theoretical framework that combines scholarship on Information Infrastructures, Commons and PD. Against this framework Marttila interrogates how the information infrastructures and conditions that surround digital cultural heritage can be active in constructing and contributing to cultural commons. While doing this, she draws attention to the gap that exists between on the one hand official institutional digital cultural heritage collections, systems and practices, and on the other hand the digital platforms and practices through which everyday people create, curate and share digital cultural works.

In order to understand how to critically and productively bridge this gap, Marttila presents insights gained from conducting three design research cases that engage both cultural heritage institutions and everyday media users. Building upon this empirical work, and latching on to scholarship on the notion of infrastructuring, Marttila proposes four infrastructuring strategies for cultural commons: probing and building upon the installed base, stimulating and simulating design and use through gateways, producing and pooling shared resources, and, lastly, fostering and shaping a commons culture that supports commoning. In exploring these strategies, Marttila maps the territory between commons and infrastructuring, and connects these notions to the PD tradition.

In addition, drawing on her practical design work, Marttila discusses requirements for professional designers operating on commons frameworks and with collective action. By doing this, her dissertation not only breaks new theoretical ground through advancing theoretical considerations relevant to contemporary design research, especially the field of PD, but also contributes practical implications useful for professional digital media design practice, especially for designers working in the fields of digital culture and cultural heritage.

Welcome!

Defence in the field of New Media: M.Soc.Sci. Pirkka Åman

In the thesis, Pirkka Åman explores music recommendation systems and suggests new discovery strategies that make use of context information, information describing the listener’s situation. The ethical cornerstone of the thesis is to support cultural diversity by influencing music recommendations towards non-obvious and non-mainstream music. Åman believes that one way to achieve serendipitous – new, good, and often surprising – musical discoveries is to offer people ways to augment urban environments with music.

FRIDAY 12 JANUARY 2018 from 12:00
Lecture hall 822, ARABIA

Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture
Hämeentie 135 C, 00560, Helsinki

M.Soc.Sci. Pirkka Åman will defend his thesis Musical Serendipity. Designing for Contextual Music Recommendation and Discovery. on Friday 12 January 2018.

Opponent: PhD François Pachet, Spotify

Custos: prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Discussion will be in English.

More information

In the thesis, Pirkka Åman explores music recommendation systems and suggests new discovery strategies that make use of context information, information describing the listener’s situation. The ethical cornerstone of the thesis is to support cultural diversity by influencing music recommendations towards non-obvious and non-mainstream music. Åman believes that one way to achieve serendipitous – new, good, and often surprising – musical discoveries is to offer people ways to augment urban environments with music.

Today, almost all music that has been recorded is available online. The problem for music lovers is finding the most interesting music from the catalogs of millions of tracks. One way to approach the problem is to include some kind of context information to recommendations, for example, location, time, social context or activity.

The author presents concepts and prototypes showcasing the potential uses of context information and analyzes interactions and context information used in commercial services and research prototypes. The results of the thesis show that involving context factors in music recommendation can lead to rewarding user experiences and serendipitous discoveries. The focus of music discovery is in urban environments where the field studies where conducted. The field study participants felt that the discovery of music and events improved the quality of the everyday life, showing the potential for similar commercial services.

On a more abstract level, the ethical undercurrent of the work is promoting cultural diversity as well as co-creation of urban environments with music-related applications. Through the concepts and prototypes, the author aimed to empower people by offering means to modify their environments by creating, experiencing and sharing virtual, augmented layers of music and other media content.

While the results show that the users indeed experienced serendipity in many ways, it can not be proven that context-aware music recommendations necessarily lead to cultural diversity. Instead, design implications are given to help designers and researchers of future systems to build rewarding and enjoyable context-aware content services, especially to enrich urban environments. The implications include:

Supporting open meaning-making through combinations of different media content and places;
Visual and interactive UI elements that communicate the system logic or explain why a recommendation was made;
Positive restrictions, such as allowing the content to be available only when the user is near a certain location or within a defined time window;
Supporting serendipity can be approached in many ways, for example by combining music with an activity, a location, certain time or an identity, which may result in serendipitous discoveries of not only music but the cultural layers of urban environments as well.
The work helps in opening new directions in the domain of social media since there are few studies conducted on music and social media services from the contextual point of view. Furthermore, various context-aware services (e.g. mobile shopping, advertising, travel and lifestyle applications) that sense people’s activity or location may benefit from the work.

Welcome!

PhD François Pachet, Spotify – A Guest lecture

Welcome to an open lecture at Media Lab!

PhD François Pachet, Director of Spotify Creator Technology Research Lab

‘Artificial Intelligence for music generation: the making of the album “Hello World”‘

Time: Thursday January 11, 2018, 4pm–6pm
Location: Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Johanna meeting room, 1st floor

This guest lecture is part of Media Lab DA Seminar but open for everyone interested!

Warmly welcome!

François Pachet is director of the Spotify CTRL (Creator Research Technology Lab).

He is the former director of the SONY Computer Science Laboratory Paris, where he led the music research team. He received his Ph.D. and Habilitation degrees from Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC). He is a Civil Engineer (Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées) and was Assistant Professor in Artificial Intelligence at UPMC until 1997. He joined the Sony Computer Science Laboratory in 1997 and created the music team to conduct research on interactive music listening, composition and performance. Since its creation, the team developed several award winning technologies (constraint-based spatialisation, intelligent music scheduling using metadata) and systems: MusicSpace, PathBuilder, Continuator for interactive music improvisation, Flow Composer, etc.).

He has been Principal Investigator of the Flow Machines ERC Advanced Grant, and has launched the first multi-artist mainstream music album composed with AI. His current goal in Spotify is to build a new generation of tools to assist music creation.

François Pachet has published intensively in artificial intelligence and computer music. He was elected ECCAI Fellow in 2014 and he is Doctor Honoris Causa of the University of Pernambuco (Brazil).

He is also an accomplished musician (guitar, composition) and has published two music albums (in jazz and pop) as composer and performer.

See: www.francoispachet.fr

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Media Lab Doctoral seminar together with the Department of Design!

Welcome to the first joint research seminar hosted by Department of Media and Department of Design. During the seminar you will be treated with inspiring and cutting edge research as well as some sparkling!

When? Wednesday 13 December, from 15:00-17:00.
Where? Johanna meeting room (116), Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor.

Presentations in the event follow the PechaKucha format: each presentation contains 20 slides that are shown 20 seconds each. Simple and inspiring!

DOM Presentations by:
Khalil Klouche: Designing for Information Exploration
Yrjö Tuunanen: Narrative Transparency in Online Journalism

DOD Presentations by:
Elif Öztekin: Eco-settlements as Niche Innovations for Sustainability Transitions

Responsible teachers: 
Lily Díaz-Kommonen, Professor of New Media, Department of Media
Miikka J. Lehtonen, Visiting Assistant Professor in Design Business Management

This seminar is open for everyone interested in contemporary research in media and design.

Welcome!

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar November 23

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday November 23, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Professor Jari Saramäki, Dept. of Computer Science, and Khalil Klouche, doctoral student at Media Lab. See abstracts below.

The seminar is open for all. Welcome!


Mobile phones, social networks, and patterns of interaction

by Professor Jari Saramäki

Abstract: The world is run by networks – from networks of biological processes inside our cells to the neural networks of our brains, and very importantly, to the social networks that we are all part of. Many of the most important, disruptive technological changes of the recent decades have been driven by our need to form and maintain social ties: mobile telephones, the Internet, social media platforms. However, science has only lately started to uncover the large-scale features of human social networks. I will present a series of discoveries on human social networks, obtained with the help of Big Data on mobile phone communication between millions of individuals. I will focus on the importance of weak ties, the persistence of the ways how we structure our social networks, and the tendency for similar people to communicate with each other, and discuss the implications of these findings.

file_crop1_1157679_y_384Prof. Jari Saramäki (born 1971) is an internationally recognised scholar working in the fields of complex systems and networks (ISI Web of Science: 80 publications, 3505 citations, h-index 27 / Google Scholar: h-index 35, 7460 citations). He received his PhD in 1998 in engineering physics, studying low-temperature quantum phenomena. He has also worked in data mining and telecommunications industries. He has been appointed an invited professor at École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France (May 2017), visiting scholar at the University of Oxford, UK (fall 2010) and visiting professor at the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium (Sept 2008). He has been one of the pioneers of the temporal networks framework and is well-known for work in social networks and computational social science.


iMac

Entity-based Affordances for Fluid Information Practices

by Khalil Klouche

Abstract: In the early 90s, document linking and embedding was described as the new hypermedia structuring paradigm, and the world wide web was quickly spreading, fueled by the miracle of the hyperlink. Since then, users are guided from one source of information to another via fixed references determined by the content creators, and rely on search engines when they need personalized access points to the information space. Although the same paradigm has subsisted so far, it is not suited to the current reality of information access, which brings both challenges and technical opportunities, and makes for an appropriate time to think of an alternative information seeking paradigm.

The amount of available information keeps on growing, and access points provided by conventional query-and-response search engines – the ten blue links – are too narrow to offer a sensible overview of available material related to a given query. We need options for broader and more personalized access to information, as well as support for making sense of it. Thankfully, new technologies in information retrieval create opportunities to address these problems and rethink on-line media access and structuring. As entity search and recommendation become a reality, the user’s information trail relies less on documents linked explicitly by content creators. Users have now the opportunity to finely steer their progression within the information space, in accordance to their immediate needs, understanding and inspiration. Related information and overview of the data can be computed on the fly to suit the very specific needs of each user at any time during the exploration, providing constant access to more detailed or more general information, new directions and branching topics.

My research explores interaction techniques designed to support entity-based information exploration, and grounds it in available literature. The main contribution is a design template describing the hypercue, an interactive representation of entities that provides personalized access points to information, and which serves as a complement to the hyperlink. Hypercues create opportunities to flexibly discover, store and share information, and gain insights of the data. The Hypercue design template consists of a minimal set of affordances that ensure all important features for supporting exploratory search can be addressed, while leaving enough design space to facilitate integration within a variety of systems.

HIIT_OtaniemiKhalil Klouche is a doctoral student at Media Lab Helsinki and a researcher in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) at the Computer Science department of University of Helsinki. He holds a master’s degree in interactive design from the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland. His research focuses on the design, development and evaluation of novel interactive systems to access and explore information.

Lily Díaz’s presentation at Workshop IEEE ISMAR 2017 in Nantes

Professor in New Media and Head of Research at the Department of Media in Aalto University Lily Díaz-Kommonen is presenting a paper at Workshop IEEE ISMAR 2017: VR and AR meet Creative Industries on October 13th in Nantes, France.

Interactive Diorama: A virtual reality (VR) reconstruction of The Anatomy Lesson of Doctor Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, 1632

Abstract: This document describes some aspects of a design and research project undertaken during the years 2013–2017 by the Systems of Representation research group in the Department of Media at Aalto University in Finland. The objective of the work has been to create an interactive diorama based on the painting The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp. The diorama concept comprises a virtual reality simulation of the artwork in which several of the characters in the painting are re-created as 3D avatars and combined with other audiovisual media including sound and video. Using the HTC-Vive virtual reality system as interface, it is possible for a guest in an exhibition to extent enter the space of the painting itself and to interact with the characters. It is intended that the diorama will be displayed in diverse venues and to a large variety of audiences. This implies a challenge for which there is a need to develop new design knowledge. In this essay I argue that information architecture (IA) can be used in the structuring of the participant’s experience as well as in the organizing and management of contents.

See more: http://ismar-creativeindustries.polytech.univ-nantes.fr/index.html

 

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar October 26

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday October 26, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Jane Vita and Jihye Lee. See abstracts below.


servicesandox_assets

Co-creating digital experiences for places

A multilayered and multidisciplinary view on designing for hybrid services, digital and physical, to empower experiences and build conversations in between people and places.

by Jane Vita

Abstract: Technology in the physical environment can be the elephant in the room when poorly implemented. To better understand how well technology fits into different physical environments, it is necessary not only to discover the right moment to bring digital to space and understand the customer’s needs but also have the multidisciplinary experts involved in its concept creation; working together to achieve the desired goals.

This research aims to help professionals understand the role of technology in places and to give them tools that could meaningfully maximise technology’s role. This study will focus on building a user-centered framework that utilizes concept layers as the groundwork.

The framework will have a significant focus on experience and technology. The layers will be a reproduction of what factors are essential to consider when designing hybrid services, combining physical and digital. The research will result in the production of a user-centered framework, a toolkit and utilization guide for designing better places for a hybrid environment.

To start experimenting, Jane has created the Service Sandbox method and toolkit, and together with few colleagues, she has applied the tool to the context of Smart Living. She has facilitated few workshops with professionals and in conferences around the world. More about Service Sandbox: http://www.servicesandbox.net

jane_picJane Vita – Brazilian living in Finland – Service Design Lead at Digitalist and Ph.D. student at Aalto, New media, LeGroup.

Over the past 19 years, I’ve had the opportunity to gain experience in many of the design competencies, with projects in a range of different industries. At Digitalist I’m facilitating internal and external dialogue around the service design practice area. In client projects, my role is to act as a lead consultant helping customers to discover their digital future. These projects vary from extensive discovery to design sprints.

I conduct a Service Design in Digital Context course lectures in the Service Innovation and Design program at Laurea University. I’m also a Ph.D. student at Aalto University, together with Learning Environments Research Group I get involved in research, design, and development of New Media tools, as well as their use and application, in the field of learning.

Co-creation is an integral part of my work as service design. There are countless tools out there available to map experiences, describe paths and journeys, but what I needed was a tool to explore, play freely and in an open environment and the context of a place. I have experienced many design tools, and I even gave workshops at ISA14, Interaction 16 and Interaction 17 around the topic of Intelligent Spaces. However, together with few colleagues and as part of my research and with the client permission, I’m creating a Service Sandbox to prototype “smart experiences,” along with different canvases to map and validate the value the services would bring for the customers.

More about Jane: http://www.janevita.com


Screen Shot 2017-10-11 at 12.01.27 copy

(Image Courtesy : The CHESS Project)

Investigating User Experience(UX) Factors in Digital Heritage

by Jihye Lee

Abstract: Digital Heritage presented by augmented/virtual reality technology offers audiences entry to spaces that are difficult to access physically or in time such as the past. Since digital technology has emerged significantly, digital heritage realm seems blossom accordingly. However, a question that emerges is: when digital heritage experience is planned, what elements of user experience(UX) should be considered? The UX might be differently designed in accordance with the heritage’s characteristics or its goal.

Investigating recent digital heritage works, the researcher will analyze them in a point of factors of user experience and argue that each different UX brings different effects for audiences. Conversely, different goal in designing digital heritage should have different UX approach. In this sense, the researcher attempts to categorize the works of digital heritage by its UX approach, and explore its characteristics in details. Throughout the analysis, further study and implementation can be expected for designers who build digital heritage experience to consider more precise and effective UX factors at the early stage of the design process.

Screen Shot 2017-10-11 at 12.01.45Jihye Lee is a visiting researcher at the Department of Media at Aalto University, and a recent PhD graduate in Film and Digital Media Design at the Hong Ik University, Seoul, South Korea. Her PhD thesis was about participatory process in mobile Augmented Reality with anthropological approach. She has worked in cultural institutions and colleges with interest in interactive storytelling and participatory design. Due to recent participation in digital heritage museum project in Korea, she has begun to focus on designing in digital heritage sector.

HELDIG DI­GITAL HU­MAN­IT­IES SUM­MIT 2017

Oct 18, 2017, 9:00–18:00  (Wednesday)

University of Helsinki, Main Building, Small Hall (Pieni juhlasali), 4050
Fabianinkatu 33, Helsinki, FINLAND

Helsinki Centre for Digital Humanities (HELDIG) was launched by a kick-off symposium on Oct 6, 2016 that was attended by some 200 friends of Digital Humanities. HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 provides a snapshot of activities within the centre and its collaboration network after the first year of operation, facilitating networking and sharing results within the Finnish community of Digital Humanities research and education and beyond.

PRO­GRAMME
After opening the Summit, the first presentation slot of the day contains talks from the seven faculties of the University of Helsinki involved in the HELDIG initiative. After this, presentations from collaborating organizations of the HELDIG network are heard. After the lunch, talks about projects, research, and applications underway are given.

After the presentations, there is a networking event based on posters and demos in the lobby, with nibbles and cocktails served.

SEE MORE: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/helsinki-centre-for-digital-humanities/heldig-digital-humanities-summit-2017

RE­GIS­TRA­TION
Participation in HELDIG Digital Humanities Summit 2017 is open and free, but registration is required for catering.

Register here Tuesday 10th October latest :

https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/81397/lomake.html

 

ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)

Special Issue on Evaluation of Digital Cultural Resources

Guest Editors
Maria Economou, University of Glasgow, UK
Ian Ruthven, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK
Areti Galani, University of Newcastle, UK
Milena Dobreva, UCL Qatar
Marco de Niet, University of Leiden Library, The Netherlands


Scope and Context

Digital technologies are affecting all aspects of our lives, reshaping the way we communicate, learn, and approach the world around us. In the case of cultural institutions, digital applications are used in all key areas of operation, from documenting, interpreting and exhibiting the collections to communicating with diverse audience groups. The communication of collections information in digital form, whether an online catalogue, mobile application, museum interactive or social media exchange, increasingly affects our cultural encounters and shapes our perception of cultural organizations. Although cultural and higher education institutions around the world are heavily investing on digitization and working to make their collections available online, we still know very little about who uses digital collections, how they interact with the associated data, and what the impacts of these digital resources are.

The issue seeks to address this gap by bringing together interested parties from a range of disciplines (e.g. digital heritage, museology, information studies, digital humanities), practices and sectors to discuss the latest developments on evaluating the use of cultural digital resources.

Topics and Themes

The issue will appeal to academics and practitioners working in a range of disciplines: cultural heritage workers, arts professionals and scholars interested in issues relating to digital resources and their impact upon curation, education, engagement and outreach. We invite submissions of both theoretical and practical approaches, efforts and trends in this emergent field presenting innovative research. Topics and issues to be addressed include but are not limited to:

  • Who uses digital cultural resources, where, and how these resources changed the consolidated working practice
  • Addressing diverse users’ needs and expectations (i.e. from schoolchildren and families to students and researchers)
  • Assessing impact, use and value of digital cultural resources (methodologies, approaches and issues)
  • Ways of recording and assessing impact and value
  • Models of access to digital collections
  • Evaluating participatory models of work in digital cultural heritage (crowdsourcing, citizen science, co-creation, co-curation)
  • Moving from impact to value when assessing digital resources
  • Use of evaluation data in the curation of digital collections
  • Integrating evaluation when working with communities in digital cultural heritage
  • Adapting old and testing new innovative methods when evaluating quality, use and effectiveness of digital cultural resources
  • User studies
  • Metrics, webmetrics, infometrics and usage statistics
  • Evaluating emotional impact in digital heritage
  • Research on impact of social media on the usage of digital cultural resources

Organizers

The idea for this special issue arose from the activities of the Scottish Network on Digital Cultural Resources Evaluation (ScotDigiCH) (scotdigich.wordpress.com/), funded by The Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2015-2016, and particularly from the discussions and papers presented at the International Symposium on Evaluating Digital Cultural Resources (EDCR2016) which took place in Glasgow in December 2016 (scotdigich.wordpress.com/events/symposium/). ScotDigiCH is coordinated by Information Studies at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with The Hunterian at the University of Glasgow, Glasgow Life Museums, the Moving Image Archive of the National Library of Scotland and the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Strathclyde.

This focused issue arises from the work of ScotDigiCH but invites submissions from all researchers and cultural heritage practitioners working in this area.

Paper Submission

Papers submitted to this special issue for possible publication must be original and must not be under consideration for publication in any other journal or conference. Previously published or accepted conference papers must contain at least 30% new material to be considered for the special issue.

Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage. Papers will be reviewed following the journal’s standard review process. Please follow the format instructions for the journal (jocch.acm.org/authors.cfm). All manuscripts must be prepared according to the journal publication guidelines which can also be found on the website provided above.

All papers are to be submitted at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jocch. Upon submission, under “Article Type”, please select “Evaluation of Digital Cultural Resources” or your manuscript will not be reviewed correctly for the special issue.

Please address inquiries to Maria.Economou@glasgow.ac.uk.

Important Dates

  • Paper submission deadline: November 30, 2017
  • First Author Notification: January 30, 2018
  • Revised papers expected: March 30, 2018
  • Final acceptance notification: May, 2018
  • Publication: Issue 4, 2018