Category Archives: New Media

Media Lab Doctoral Seminar September 21, 2017

Welcome to the Media Lab Doctoral Seminar
TIME: Thursday September 21, from 16:00–19:00
LOCATION: Aalto University Harald Herlin Learning Centre, Otaniementie 9, Espoo (Otaniemi), 1st floor room 116 (Johanna meeting room).

DOM-L0003 Doctor of Arts at Media Lab Seminar
Responsible  teacher: Prof. Lily Díaz-Kommonen

Presentations by Yrjö Tuunanen and Pirkka Åman. See abstracts below.


Yrjö Tuunanen: Narrative Transparency in Web-Based Multimodal News Discourse

Abstract: The development of information and communication technologies provides innovative ways for compiling multimodal news accounts. Ideally, new narrative structures offer productive ways for media professionals to report complex issues and mechanisms in society, politics, and economy supporting comprehensible, proportional and contextualized journalism.

For news audience, knowledge on potential of digital news storytelling, as well as transparency within journalistic processes and accounts, is increasingly important in the era of the expansion of (audio)visual news dissemination (Pew Research Center 2014), “fake” and “real” news phenomena, as well as diverse media platforms redelivering filtered news feeds and facilitating discussion on current topics.

This dissertation focuses on the ways in which phototexts and other multimodal news compilations implement transparency within their narrative structures and practices. Moreover, this dissertation discusses the potential of narrative transparency, not yet deployed within multimodal news narration. Accordingly, it suggests additional ways for supporting transparent and contextualized news dissemination and advancing news discourse skills for media audience.

This research is based on studies on narration (Abbott 2008; Herman; 2007; Ryan 2007, 2014) including sociological (Somers & Gibson 1994) and psychological (Bruner 1986, 1990, 1991) perspectives on narrative. It builds on theories of multimodality (Kress and Leeuwen 2006; O´Halloran 2011; Page 2010), and on literature on civic voice and culture (Couldry 2010; Dahlgren 2011). Furthemore, it draws on theories of narrative paradigm (Fisher 1999), news frames and news narratives (Johnson-Cartee 2005) as well as literature on media studies (Baudrillard 1994; Chouliaraki 2008; Massumi 2010).

This dissertation contributes to discussions on the paradigmatic shift from objectivity tradition toward transparency norm in journalism (Hellmueller et al. 2013; Karlsson 2010; Kovach & Rosenstiel 2014; Shcudson 2001). Among scholars, transparency has been discussed as “the new objectivity” and defined in terms of 1) disclosure transparency and 2) participatory transparency (Karlsson 2010). This thesis brings a new perspective to this field by focusing on narrative transparency, a rhetorical aspect of transparency, that has not been studied and discussed thoroughly in journalism studies.

See PDF for full list of references.

YT_portraitYrjö Tuunanen is a doctoral candidate in Media Lab. His dissertation studies multimodal news narratives. He holds a master’s degree in Photography from University of Industrial Arts, Helsinki, and since 1990, he has worked as a photojournalist and a teacher of digital and documentary photography. From 2013 onwards, he has worked as a consultant on digital visualisation of financial news and information for the Ministry of Finance, Finland. Together with Heidi Hirsto, D.Sc. (Econ.), he has been running a collaborative research project titled: M-Scopes, Mediated Significations of Finance, focusing on the ways in which economic phenomena and mechanisms are represented in the web-based news media.


Pirkka Åman: Musical serendipity – Designing for contextual music recommendation and discovery

Abstract: Online content services commonly offer personalized content such as books, TV series and music that are tailored to the users’ personal preferences. Online music recommendation services are a subset of personalizable services. As music preferences vary greatly across music listening situations, information about the user’s situation, that is, context information has recently been started to involve in recommendations.

In this thesis, I suggest new ways of including context information, mainly location, to music recommendations by presenting concepts and prototypes that were field tested with real-life users. In the articles, I presented two prototypes, Sounds of Helsinki (Article II) and OUTMedia (Article IV), as well as a platform platform for several context-aware music service concepts (Article III). Furthermore, two articles reviewed the existing music services for their explanations and transparency (Article I) and the ways they involved context factors in interacting with music recommendation and discovery tasks.

The underlying argument and a starting point for the thesis was that by involving context factors, ultimately cultural diversity could be fostered. In an ideal case, adding context to music recommendations would lead to recommendations that offer more non-mainstream music than channels such as the playlist radio or playlists of new releases of online music services. That would lead to better chances for serendipitous discoveries, and, ultimately, given that the user base would be large enough, would promote cultural diversity as well.

While the results show that the users indeed experienced serendipity in many ways, in the light of the results it can not be proven that context-aware music recommendations necessarily lead to cultural diversity. In addition, the results can not be generalized to all context-aware music recommendation cases. Instead, design implications are given to help designers and researches of future systems to build rewarding and enjoyable context-aware content services, especially to enrich the urban environments. These include Supporting open meaning-making through combinations of different media content and places; Visual and interactive UI elements that communicate the system logic or explain why a recommendation was made; Positive restrictions: for example, with location-sensitivity as a positive restriction, allowing the content to be available only when the user is at or nearby a certain location; Supporting serendipity can be approached in many ways, for example, combining music with an activity, a location, certain time or an identity can effectively promote serendipitous discoveries.

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 11.20.01Pirkka Åman is a post-graduate student at Media Lab Helsinki, School of Art, Design and Architecture, Aalto University. In his doctoral dissertation he studies how to support music discovery and recommendation in urban environments through ubiquitous interfaces.

Pawlicka

Open lecture at Media Lab

Welcome to an open lecture

The Laboratory Turn in the Humanities

by Dr. Urszula Pawlicka
Visiting Researcher in Media Lab
Department of Media, Aalto University

3 October 2017, from 13:00–14:00
Department of Media, Aalto ARTS
Miestentie 3, Otaniemi, 4th floor, room 426

The humanities has made significant conceptual shifts that include fostering strong innovative and collaborative research, employing technologies, and building a bridge between the academy, industry, and community. Above changes mean designing and defining the humanities anew. Creating an academic discipline requires an ‘administrative imagination’; that is to say we must build a structure aligned with development strategy. Consequently, the humanities has undergone an ‘infrastructure turn’ over the past ten years and launched a new physical place: a laboratory. The emergence of labs in the humanities has been crucial for “redefining the role of the humanities” and “re-configuration of the humanities offered by computational technologies”; however, the proliferation and the fragmentation of labs have led to a state of emergency when it becomes urgent to investigate their significance, objectives, and impact.

The goal of the presentation is to analyze three aspects of the humanities labs: its impetus, implementation, and impact. The first part aims to trace a history of the humanities labs, covering the impulse and the mechanism of their creation. This section includes also mapping out laboratories in the humanities established all over the world. The second part presents the complex landscape of the laboratories in the humanities, launched in various ways as a physical research lab, a makerspace, a virtual network, a community project, etc. The last part examines the features of laboratories that significantly reconfigure the humanities seen as an innovative, digital technology-based field, hands-on experimental research, situated practice, engaged in community affairs, and collaborating with local companies.

Urszula Pawlicka is a visiting researcher in Media Lab Helsinki at Aalto University. She obtained her Doctorate degree in Literary Studies at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (2016). She participated in the following international conferences and scholarships: “The Making of the Humanities VI” at the University of Oxford (2017), the American Comparative Literature Association’s Annual Meeting at Harvard University (2016), Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria (2014), Fulbright Scholarship in Creative Media and Digital Culture at Washington State University Vancouver, WA, US (2014/2015), and fellowship in English Department at Stony Brook University, NY, US (2015). Over the years, she has published peer-reviewed scholarly articles (“English Studies”, “CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture”, and “Teksty Drugie”) and two monographs, including Literatura cyfrowa. W stronę podejścia procesualnego (Electronic Literature: Towards Processual Approach) released this month. Her current research interests include the infrastructure and conceptual transformations in the humanities, digital humanities, and the sociology of scientific knowledge.

urszulapawlicka.com

Call-for-Works._31.08

Designing Knowledge

Aalto University, Department of Media and ACM SIGGRAPH would like to invite you and your community to take part in Designing Knowledge online exhibition.

We encourage unique submissions that present different ways of ‘thinking and doing things in knowledge production and design’.

We welcome works describing how digital archives are used in activities that involve the creation, dissemination, transformation, and sharing of knowledge on a wide variety of topics such as:

• Digital Arts and Computer Graphics
• Digital Humanities
• Sciences

Submissions must include at least 10 keywords that accurately describe the work and areas of knowledge and activity.

Final deadline on the 30th of September

For more information please visit: https://designing-knowledge.siggraph.org/wp

Reimagining video conferencing – a design workshop with MIT MediaLab and Aalto MediaLab

Reimagining video conferencing is a co-design workshop aiming to create alternative solutions for virtual panel discussions, video conferencing and other kinds of group meetings online. In this participatory session we will think and discuss about user experiences for a tool that would extend user engagement over physical location and achieve a rich ecology for participation online. The layout and user interface of a tool for group video conferencing would be challenged and reimagined also. This event is organised and led by the Learning Environments research group in MediaLab, department of Art, design and architecture, Aalto University, FI in collaboration with MIT Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
It is free and open for participation for students and non-students.

Sign up by sending an email to jana.pejoska@aalto.fi including your name, department, study focus, skills (design, development, etc.) and a short description why you are applying.
Thu 14 September
13:30-16:30
Johanna, Learning Centre
Public event

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 16 – Spring 2018

Journal for Artistic Research (JAR)

The deadline for consideration is 15 September 2017

JAR publishes artistic research from all arts disciplines, with or without academic affiliation, and includes the work of artistic research practitioners and theorists. Rethinking the traditional journal format, JAR offers its contributors a free-to-use online space called the Research Catalogue (RC) where text can be woven together with image, audio and video material. The Journal is specifically interested in contributions that reflect upon and expose artistic practice as research, and welcomes submissions from artists interested in exchanging ideas and opening up the processes and methodologies that underlie their practice. Please view our archive to get a sense of what we publish.

To be considered for Peer Review, the editorial board considers:

1. Whether the exposition exposes artistic practice as research. This engages with questions and claims about knowledge within practice. For a detailed articulation of this please read the editorial to JAR0

http://www.jar-online.net/issue-0

2. The degree to which the exposition is conceptually and artistically strong, considered, and significant to the field.

3. Whether the multimedia and design capacities of the RC have been used effectively and meaningfully to support the argument or understanding of the research.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account on the RC and use the online space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit:

www.jar-online.net/submissions/

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, at submissions@jar-online.net

JAR works with an international editorial board and a large panel of peer-reviewers.

Editor in Chief: Michael Schwab

Peer Review Editor: Julian Klein

Editorial Board: Alex Arteaga, Annette Arlander, Sher Doruff, Barnaby Drabble, Mika Elo, Leonella Grasso Caprioli, Yara Guasque, Julian Klein and Mareli Stolp.

JAR is published by the Society for Artistic Research (SAR)

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/society-for-artistic-research

an independent, non-profit association. You can support JAR by becoming an individual or institutional member of SAR. More information can be found here

http://www.societyforartisticresearch.org/membership/membership-schemes
Contact: jar@jar-online.net

Swiss Open Cultural Data Hackathon 2017

Dear all,
 
Don’t forget to sign-up for the Open Cultural Data Hackathon taking place on 15-16 September 2017 at the University of Lausanne!
 
This year’s hackathon will again be accompanied by an interesting workshop programme. Two longer workshops  – one on Wikidata, and another one on OpenRefine – will take place on Thursday, 14 September already).
If you are planning to attend, please register by the end of August; this will allow us to order meals and book accommodation in the right quantities.
And if you are intending to bring some new datasets we are not aware of yet – please get in touch!
We are looking forward to welcoming many of you in Lausanne!
On behalf of the organizing team,
Beat Estermann 
Swiss Open Cultural Data Hackathon, Lausanne, 15-16 September 2017 (workshops starting already the day before) – Register Now!

CFP: iXDA and Civic Design

2 CfP’s:

1) iXDA call open due 13 Sep 17 at 11.59 CET; LYON FRANCE 3-8 Feb 2018
Interaction18.ixda.org
Lyon France
Call for Proposals due 13 Sep 2017 at 11.59 CET
———————————-
2) Call for Participation: Civic Design | On the Theory and Practice of the Social and Political in Design

14. Annual Conference | German Society for Design Theory and Research (DGTF) | Burg Giebichstein University of Art and Design, Halle | 01.-02.12.2017

We are currently experiencing a new discursive and practical shift toward the political and social dimensions in design. In close interaction to social transformations of the last few decades, the discipline of design is currently seeking to redefine itself in its relationship to socio-political complexity. The plethora of terms such as social design, transition design, transformative design and design for social innovation could be seen as a new “social turn” for design, which now increasingly understands its tasks to include programmatic transformation of societal realities. Design competency is gaining ground in transdisciplinary contexts and is consulted ever more on a practical as well as a discursive level, at the interface between business, civil society and politics, in the proverbial elevator of the bottom-up and the top-down. New questions arise regarding how roles are to be understood, depth of impact and fields of activity for design in sociopolitical transformation processes. And the disciplinary borderlines are being redrawn for design’s political realm of action.

Design has indeed always had its hand in or at least touched upon big social change processes – whether through taking a modernist stance, like the hfg Ulm or the Bauhaus, or its antithesis in disegno radicale or later critical design, but also through applying designerly strategies in the construction of populist folk identities, as with National Socialism. Today, however, a reevaluation seems to be shifting the very object of design: away from the creation of thingly artifacts toward the design of processes in the context of social complexity. Such design must be understood both conceptually and discursively in regards to its dedicated immediacy to change processes, as it is attributed with the capability to contribute to change in conjunction with other actors.

TThis development is not reducible to a broadening of design’s action horizon, rather it extends beyond the discipline itself. For example, policy makers are increasingly taking up design as a promising field for partnerships and methodologies. Complementary, new forms of communities, collectives, civic initiatives and DIY cultures are gaining political significance and are developing new forms of access and participation, drawing attention to design as a planning discipline at the intersection of digital technology, the open source community and cultural & urban studies. Digitization processes initiate and reinforce these developments, e.g. through the diversification of institutions of information, through new avenues of production or through the rising importance of digital platforms for self-organization and opinion forming.

This is the backdrop for the 14th annual DGTF Conference. We wish to more clearly define the fields of action between political decision-making power, civil society and the spheres of everyday life.

Our object of discussion will be the internal and interdisciplinary negotiations of the social and the political in design. We will be addressing both the practical as well as the theoretical and normative approaches to situate and differentiate design’s new relations to politics and society. We will also try to trace the historical developments that have led to this new negotiation in order to form the basis for discussion that synthesizes past theses and goes further.
In probing these dimensions, we will ask the following questions:

– What historical approaches are being referred to, which are we ignoring?
– What models and self-understandings do we assume, how can we contextualize these roles?
– What impact can we have on this context, what contributions can we make, where are the pitfalls?
– How far dare we go in understanding these new developments as “design” and at what point are we talking about something else entirely?

We pursue these issues in moderated panels, short lectures and parallel workshops/roundtables, as well as with an accompanying exhibition. Our three curated panels will

1. look at the origins – by asking what approaches do we refer to when discussing social and political design,

2. situate where the status quo lies in the tension between current design approaches in the area of political     initiatives and at the level of established institutions, and

3. inquire into the role of digitization processes for the evolution of a “civic design.”

In addition to the panels, we extend the invitation to contributions that conform to the following formats:
Short lectures (10 minutes): Lectures may present current practical project examples as well as discursive approaches connected to the conference theme on design practice and research and which fall  within the scope of social or political design.

Roundtables and workshops (90 minutes each): We welcome suggestions for parallel roundtables and workshops for the second half of the last conference day. We are equally open to recommendations for moderation and forms that foster further discussion and brings together themes presented. Roundtables should be an open forum for views on teaching, research and practice. For workshops we invite you to submit ideas with hands-on experiments from the field of civil tech and physical computing.

Exhibition contributions: For the accompanying exhibition, posters, prototypes, videos, objects or other items may be submitted that fit the context of the conference. The entries can be commentaries, approaches to problem solving or documentations of the research and design process. Your submissions should not exceed 500 words and must be submitted as a PDF file to mail@dgtf.de. The deadline for submissions is 31.08.2017. The selection will be made by the conference committee in cooperation with external evaluators. The notification will be sent by 30.09.2017. The “Civic Design” conference will take place on the 1st and 2nd of December 2017. The Burg Giebichenstein, University of Art and Design Halle will host the event. The conference committee consists of Bianca Herlo, Andreas Unteidig and Matthias Görlich. Please contact Malte Bergmann, head of the DGTF secretariat and coordinator of this year’s meeting, with your questions.

Please note the important dates:
31. August: Submission of full papers

30. September: Notification of acceptance

SummerSchool_poster

Media Lab Doctoral Summer School: Event-Driven Culture: “The Visit” as Case Study

Call for Participation
_ Deadline Extended August 4, 2017

Event-Driven Culture: “The Visit” as Case Study

DOM-L0006 Department of Media Doctoral School
Dates: 29–31 August 2017
Location: Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture / Department of Media – Design Factory, Engine Room, Betonimiehenkuja 5 C, 02150 Espoo, FINLAND
https://designfactory.aalto.fi

Beyond being of place, culture can also be said to be a thing of time. This is particularly the case in contemporary virtual environments where multiplicities of human culture often converge, co-exist, and co-evolve. In this three-day seminar and workshop organized by the Department of Media (Media Lab) at Aalto University we first intend to explore the notion of time and how it is represented across diverse cultures. Subsequently we will focus on the notion of ‘Event’ as a unit of analysis with the ‘Visit’ as an illustrative example.

The School includes lectures, presentations, and group exercises/workshops in which participants will engage in concept design exercises.

Faculty:

Lily Díaz-Kommonen, Prof. of New Media, host (Aalto ARTS, Media Lab) (see bio)
Zsófia Ruttkay, Associate Professor (MOME, Hungary) (see bio)
Paul Mulholland, Senior Fellow, (KMI, Open University, UK) (see bio)
Rasa Smite, Associate Professor, (Liepaja U, Latvia) (see bio)

Credits: For doctoral candidates, it is possible to receive up to 5 credits.

To participate: Send us your name, email address and a brief description of your current research indicating why participation in the course would benefit your studies and practice by Friday August 4, 2017.

For more information and registration: saara.mantyla@aalto.fi

See the Summer School website: http://mlabsummerschool.aalto.fi


Preliminary assignment

We request that you bring a 300-500 word narrative prepared about a significant visit that you realized. Your narrative should answer the 5Ws questions: Who, what, when, where and why? You will be asked to present your narrative during the first day of the School. Your presentation cannot exceed three minutes. It is possible to use images and sound.

Preliminary readings

To prepare for the discussion and work please read, annotate and extract up to five keywords from the texts included below.

  • Pratt, Mary Louise, “Arts of the Contact Zones”, Modern Language Association (MLA), 1991. https://serendip.brynmawr.edu/oneworld/system/files/PrattContactZone.pdf, (Accessed on 30/07/2017.)
  • Clifford, James, Routes, Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century, Harvard University Press, 1997.
  • Kimmel, Michael, “Properties of the Body: Lessons Learned from the Anthropology of Embodiment.” In R. Frank, R. Dirven, T. Ziemke, E. Bernández Eds., Body, Language and Mind, Mouton de Gruyer: Berlin, 2007.

Tasks

  • Using a systemic approach, map out the experience of ‘the visit’.
  • Consider how the digital bears an impact on the experience of the visit. What are the pros and cons? Focus on data gathering processes, from a multimodal perspective (e.g. text, images, sound, smell? touch?).
  • Using design research methods, propose a concept for an application (or tool) that supports this significant event, from a human-oriented perspective.

This Doctoral School will take place at the Aalto Design Factory, Otaniemi.
Getting there: 
http://www.aalto.fi/en/about/contact/route_otaniemi/

Screen Shot 2017-06-06 at 13.43.57

CALL FOR PAPERS Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage Supporting Cultural Heritage through Innovative Technologies

Editor-in-Chief
Roberto Scopigno, Institute of Computer Science and Technologies (ISTI)
National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Information For Contributors

ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH) publishes papers of significant and lasting value in all areas relating to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in support of Cultural Heritage. The journal encourages the submission of manuscripts that demonstrate new technology or innovative use of technology for the discovery, analysis, interpretation and presentation of cultural material, as well as manuscripts that illustrate applications in the Cultural Heritage sector that challenge the computational technologies and suggest new research opportunities in computer science.

The field Cultural Heritage spans many distinct sub-areas, which may be divided into two major classifications: tangible heritage, such as the discovery, documentation, organization, interpretation and communication of artifacts, monuments, sites, museums, and collections (including digital archives, catalogues and libraries); and intangible heritage, such as music, performance, storytelling, and mythology. In addition, the increasing volume of digital cultural artifacts and collections is becoming an important body of heritage content in its own right. Submissions that have led to actual cultural applications are particularly welcomed. Papers may be one of several types: research paper; tutorial/survey; software/algorithms; addendum/corrections; datasets.

Topics include:

  • On-site and remotely sensed data collection
  • Enhanced 2D media for CH
  • 3D digital artifact capture, representation and manipulation
  • Tools for reconstruction and processing of digital representations
  • Metadata, classification schema, ontologies and semantic processing for CH multimedia repositories
  • Analytic tools to assist scholars’ research on collections or artifacts
  • ICT assistance in monitoring and restoration
  • Augmentation of physical collections with digital presentations
  • Virtual and Augmented Reality technologies for virtual and digital museums
  • Human-Computer interfaces for virtual and digital museums
  • Story-telling and other forms of communication, multimedia systems
  • Serious games
  • Web-based and mobile technologies for CH
  • Long term preservation of digital artifacts
  • Provenance, copyright and IPR
  • Digital capture and annotation of intangible heritage (performance, audio, dance, oral heritage)
  • ICT technologies in support of creating new cultural experiences or digital artifacts
  • Applications (e.g. in Education and Tourism)

Associate Editors

  • Juan Barceló, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Spain
  • Francesco Bellotti, University of Genova, Italy
  • Pere Brunet, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
  • Areti Damala, University of Strathclyde, UK
  • Matteo Dellepiane, ISTI-CNR, Italy
  • Livio de Luca, CNRS/MCC MAP, France
  • Luciana Duranti, University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Susan Hazan, The Israel Museum, Israel
  • Win Hupperetz, Allard Pierson Museum, University of Amsterdam, The Nederlands
  • Tsvi Kuflik, University of Haifa, Israel
  • Xuelong Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Carlo Meghini, ISTI-CNR, Italy
  • Mark Mudge, Cultural Heritage Imaging, USA
  • Sofia Pescarin, CNR ITABC, Italy
  • Fabio Remondino, Bruno Kessler Foundation, Italy
  • Julian Richards, University of York, UK
  • Karina Rodriguez-Echavarria, University of Brighton, UK
  • Robert Sablatnig, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
  • Filippo Stanco, University of Catania, Italy
  • Didier Stricker, German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Germany

Visit jocch.acm.org for further information or to submit your manuscript.